“The Sprinklers” (A Mother’s Day Essay)

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(My daughter, Alissa, wrote this Friday for one of her final assignments. It fits in nicely for mother’s day.)

Sprinklers

My mom used to tell my sisters and me that if we ran through the sprinklers we would feel like different people. We could do anything, be anything, without worrying about the future. When we ran through the sprinklers we were transported to whole different worlds. Some with endless possibilities. All with childlike joy and imagination. “The sprinklers will always be there for you. You just have to look for them.”

My older sister and I used to run through the sprinklers every afternoon in the park near our school. We skipped to the park and stopped by the edge of the grass. We put our backpacks down and took off our shoes, then lined our toes up to where the sidewalk meets the grass – just barely touching the wetness. I would close my eyes and hear my mother’s voice echoing in my mind, telling me I could be whatever I wanted to be in those sprinklers. I looked at my sister and we held hands as we were transported to a different world. Running through sprinklers. Running through sparkling, diamond drops of water. Possibilities. Joy.

I am now a senior in high school. My baby steps are over, and it’s time to become an adult. Being an adult comes with responsibilities and worries. I walk home from school on a sunny day and I think about the future. What will I study in college? Will I graduate? Will I ever move out of my parents house? How will I pay for all the adult stuff like insurance and utilities? Will I ever get a job to help me pay for all of these things? Will I find a career that I love?

My mind was ripped away from that worrisome reality when I felt water hitting my toes. I looked up to see the sprinklers in the park near the school. I glanced around. Was anyone going to see me? Who cares?! I put my backpack down and took my sandals off, and lined my toes up to where the sidewalk meets the grass. My toes barely touched the wetness. I looked around again, and then I went for it. As I ran through the sprinklers carefree and in my own world, I could hear my mom’s voice, “You can be anything, do anything.” I was laughing as all my troubles went away. I was in a different place where I felt safe and free. There were endless possibilities. Whatever happens in life that makes me stressed and upset, I can and will always count on those sprinklers to be there for me. I believe in running through sprinklers and connecting with my inner child. I’ll never let go of her, especially when she is needed most. The sprinklers will always be there – I just have to look for them.

— Alissa Giannatti, May 2015

Portrait Class Members Discuss the Workshop

“Imitate. Assimilate. Innovate.”

Clark Terry, Jazz trumpet genius.

This portrait class (and the companion 102 class) have been huge successes. The students are fired up and some are saying they are making the best images of their lives.

We look closely at the work of 8 major portrait photographers and study their way of working, lighting, posing, gestures, style and presentation. NOT in order to copy them, but in order to find the elements that ring true with our own experiences and aesthetics. To be ‘inspired by’ is the goal, and we all want to be inspired by the best.

Skrebneski, Karsh, Moon, Lindbergh, Ritts, Winters, Sieff, and Coupon are amazing photographers. Each brings something to the art of photography that can inspire us to push harder, light better, be more deliberate with our work.

Many of the students remark that their images coming straight out of camera are better and better. When we think deliberately about what we are doing, the quality of the work cannot help but get better.

We currently are enrolling for a class that starts May 19th, 2015. Get more information here. These are limited engagement classes.

Photographers on the broadcast:
Barbara Brady-Smith
Catherine Vibert
Irene Liebler
Virginia Smith
Jay Chatzkel
Bob Earle
Ron Velasquez
Marianne Cherry
Hiram Chee

Photographers You Should Know: Chris von Wangenheim

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Gone too soon. Chris was a superstar fashion shooter.

Chris von Wangenheim: Wikipedia

Article and images.

Images:

A Tumblr page for inspiration.

The Fashion Spot.

Chris von Wangenheim at the Red Spot (NSFW)

Chris shooting for Dior.

Sorry about the soundtrack…

24 Frames In May

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Begins today.

It’s a non-contest, and just for fun.

Not many rules, but a few guidelines:

  1. This is for film cameras only.
  2. Black and White or Color is fine, and there are no restrictions on the type of film you shoot.
  3. Polaroid is OK.
  4. 4×5 or sheet film cameras are OK.
  5. Tintype / alternate process is OK.
  6. Images must be on a contact sheet as well as individually presented (Use Photoshop’s excellent “Contact Sheet” tool if you have had your film scanned.)
  7. Only one roll of 35mm film (or the first 24 frames of a roll of 36)
  8. Two rolls + for 6×7 120/220.
  9. No more than three exposures taken on any single day, no more than two of any single subject.
  10. Images must be presented in order of exposure.

Uploading instructions will be posted on May 31. Upload from June 1 to June 15.

If you are planning on being involved, let us all know in the comments.

Submissions will include:

  • Contact sheet
  • Camera format / brand
  • Lenses used
  • Film type and name
  • Lab used (with link please)
  • 24 individual frames ready for web at 1000 pixels on the long side.

Here is a link to last year’s submissions. I am hoping for triple the involvement this year.

Considering an option for a contest… thinking more about it and will announce before May if you can choose to be in the optional contest.

Need a film camera? Here is a list of my favorite film cameras. Let me know if you think I missed any amazing cameras. (Yeah, I gotta ad the Olympus OM-1 soon…)

I recommend this lab (FIND Labs), but you are welcome to use any lab you wish.

(photo courtesy death to the stock photo)

8WEEK-BANNER


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New Photography Books

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From Amazon.

I love Photography Books, and have a wall of them waiting for me when I have some quiet time and simply want to stimulate my brain. From early works of Steichen and Cunningham to books by Demarchelier and Watson, the photography book is one of my great loves.

There was a moment a few years ago when I thought the era of photo books was coming to an end. But lately so many great books are coming on the market that it gives me renewed hope that they will stay with us for a long while.

Here are a few that caught my eye:

Project 52 Project: Incredible Egg (Shot to Layout)

The layout was furnished and the photographers had to shoot to a fixed set of parameters. Size and position of the type could not change.

Nicole Fernley: Cookbook Project

Project 52 members sharing recent work.

Nicole Fernley:

“These four images come from a larger selection of images that I recently shot for The Cheese Lover’s Cookbook, so the common thread is, of course, cheese. The cookbook author made most of the food, and we worked together to style the shots—and sample the food. Bonus. I was grateful that Don had said over and over “Shoot to layout!” because I had the sense to ask for image size. Finding out the images were expected to fill an 8×9 page was extremely helpful—limiting, but helpful.

This set is probably not as personal as Don had expected for this final assignment, but I’m submitting them because they represent something important to me—my first paying commercial photography assignment. At the beginning of Project 52, Don had said he hoped everyone would get at least one paying commercial gig before the Project was over. I was pretty sure I was going to be the exception because I had so much more to learn than everybody else. Surprise! I got a gig. And it kicked my butt…but I learned a lot.”

Nicole Fernley Photography

David Price: Illustrated Proverbs

David Price:

“This project grew out of some recent discussions about drawing inspiration from anyone, anything, and everything around you. I admit, I drew a lot of inspiration for this idea from Irene Liebler’s series she did across last year of Common and Idiomatic Phrases – Feet To The Fire, Leaving The Nest, and so on. I thought that idea would be something I could do in my own style. I love her work, but I don’t see the world the way she does, and that’s a Good Thing™. I love that, having seen it week in and week out, we can all take the same subject and come up with completely different results.

I am doing this idea of taking old proverbs, common phrases, and idioms because it will lead to some interesting photographic possibilities, and be expandable far beyond a 5-10 shot series. I like this personal project for me, specifically, because those possibilities can extend through all of the artistic forms I enjoy working with, from portraits to still life, composites, and a whole lot of concept work. Heh, concept work: This was the area I really wanted to concentrate on for this last P52 project, as I see it as needing the most development in my own artistic growth going forward.

I hope you enjoy the series. I did!”

David Price Photography (Bay Area, CA)

From the Early Days of Color Photography

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The year was 1913.

I absolutely love these images. From composition through framing and of course the patina, they are simply lovely.

“Mervyn O’Gorman was 42 when he took these pictures of his daughter, Christina O’Gorman at Lulworth Cove, in the English county of Dorset. He photographed Christina wearing a red swimming costume and red cloak, a colour particularly suited to the early color Autochrome process. “

Se more here:

Carol Rioux “Revealing a Portrait”

Carol Rioux:

“I chose to make a series of portraits of a single person.  I chose this project because I am very interested in everything that constitutes a person as it is important to me to capture who a person is not just a pretty picture.  I photographed parts of the subject, which progressively make up the most of the entire individual but never completely.  We made many images and it was difficult to limit the choices and parts to create a whole person.  Is it just parts of the body, personal interests or a combination of both?  I changed my choices a hundred times as she also loves reading, writing and hot chocolate.  Choosing an editing style was also difficult because finding a style that suited all the images was a challenge.  I feel like I captured a part of her being – attractive, edgy, confident, private, and capable…   We shot outdoors at different times over a couple day to maximize the effects of the sun.  I brought strobes and flashes but only ended up using the sun and reflectors.”

Carol Rioux Photography

Anna Gunn “Dreams in a Suitcase”

Project 52 Member shares recent work.

Anna Gunn:

“Concept: a girl who carries her dreams in a suitcase. These dreams aren’t plans, or in any way constructive – they are merely a distraction from the beautiful, fleeting moments that life places in front of her. Yet they are so dominant over her, so heavy, that they spill out of the suitcase and intertwine with the real world… and still she carries them around.”

Anna Gunn (McGunn Media)

“I have always been more interested in the power of what a good photograph or film can do – not who created it and what box that creator fits into. I’m interested in the story one has to tell. We are visual communicators and we are all unique but only if we listen to our own voice and create from that voice. Whenever I have trusted and listened to my internal voice and created from my own unique perspective and my life’s experiences, I have been “on purpose” and my work has resonated across genders, race and age. I suppose I could copy or mimic the “style du jour” whether it is HDR or photographing hipsters with tattoos and attempt to be someone I’m not. I don’t have the desire to do that because that is not why I became a photographer or filmmaker. That’s not to say that I don’t like and appreciate photographers who are following these styles but it’s not me and creativity doesn’t come from mimicking others. I’ve seen a lot of styles and techniques over the decades I’ve been in the photo business. They come and they go – just like the photographers who chase after the latest trend.”

Read more

Catherine Vibert: Environmental Portraits

Project 52 Members share some of their recent project work over the next five posts.

Catherine Vibert:

“Environmental Portraits & Personal Branding. Through the course of the year of the Project 52, I found that my favorite subject to shoot is people. I especially love to photograph people doing what they love to do. All of the people in these photographs work for themselves, determine their own hours, their own schedules, and have built their worlds out of a passion for their work. I wanted to tell the story of what they do when that was possible. I went to each of their houses and photographed the story of their day. These images, combined with written stories, will be used on my blog to promote my marketing plan, which is to help people get beyond stock photography on their websites and social media. To help small businesses have beautiful images that tell their stories, so their customers can connect with the real human beings behind the brand.”

Catherine Vibert Photography

Portraits Inspired by Gregory Heisler

We spent a couple of weeks studying the work of Gregory Heisler. He is a remarkably talented photographer with a very disciplined approach to image making. The goal was to learn from his approach and find the inspiration to make images from what you garnered from the exploration. The idea is never to copy, only to be influenced by. I love to quote Clark Terry, jazz trumpet legend; “Imitate, Assimilate, Innovate.”

In jazz and photography.

Thanks to all of the photographers who participated.