It’s A Numbers Game: Part Two

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“The Numbers”: Part Two

It’s a numbers game… part two of our series.

Find Part One here.

Last time we discussed the numbers of getting people to see your work, and how that is so important to build a business. It’s been two weeks since that post.

How many of you:

1. Made the minimum commitment to getting to 6 people per day for three days (Tue/Wed/Thurs)?

2. Exceeded the minimum commitment and got to more than 18 people in those three days. Which means you have contacted 36+ people about your work at this point.

3. Found excuses and other things more pressing to get done.

No judgement here, only asking you to face resistance in the eye and either kick its damned ass or continue being acquiescent to it.

Resistance is NOT your friend… and if you found every reason under the sun not to do the minimum of 3 emails and 3 calls over 3 days, then you know what you have to work on.

Today’s discussion is on the numbers of contacts you make to individuals who you want to work with. We need a number of people to see our work, but we also need to touch those people more than once to get that work.

It is a process. A journey. A vision quest.

OK, so it may not be a vision quest, but it is still a process.

“Only 2% of sales occur at a first meeting

People in business often hope and expect to do business the first time they meet a prospect. Yet studies reveal that only 2% of sales occur when two parties meet for the first time.

The 2% who buy at a first meeting tend to be people who have already looked into the subject matter, and already know what they’re looking for. If they meet someone who ticks all the right boxes and they get on well, then business may well be transacted. But that is far from the norm. The other 98% will only buy once a certain level of trust has been built up.

Why 8% of Sales People Get 80% of the Sales.

Read through the link above. Giving up because there is no sale is counter to what you want to achieve. Remember, the people they are discussing above are selling something the client needs or wants.

We are selling ourselves to be considered for something the client can get from a whole host of other talented competitors. We aren’t really ‘selling’ in the traditional meaning of the word, we are promoting ourselves, sharing our work, becoming acquainted with the AD/PE/CD… not ‘selling’ them toner cartridges or accounting.

We cannot really ‘sell’ our work anyway. If there is no gig at the agency that is right for us, or no gig that is requiring photography, no amount of sales techniques or tricks or secrets can get us into a purchase order.

There is NO work that day for us.

So why go?

Because we want to be top of mind when a job DOES come in to the art department. When they think of a photographer to shoot tractors, we want to be the one that comes to mind since we shoot farms and farming equipment so dang well it makes cows give more milk.

THAT is the purpose of the meeting. The touch point.

Top of mind and becoming the one they think of when the time is right.

To do that takes more than one showing of your portfolio.

(Right about now someone is sitting out there saying “Yeah, you ain’t seen MY portfolio… I will show it and get the gig.”)

Yes, you are probably taking the reigns of your unicorn and heading out over the rainbow freeway about now too.

That rarely happens. Really rarely.

Instead what happens is that there is a slow and steady courtship of sorts. You show your work, they ignore you (or seem to) and you keep on showing your work. They may keep on ignoring you… or not.

That ‘or not’ moment is the first of several milestones.

They call you in to see the book. And to size you up.

Are you fun to work with? Are you neat and orderly about your work? Are you trustworthy? Will you be on time and on budget and not insult their client or get drunk with the models and run off to Bermuda with all the cash in hand.

Hey… it happens.

So you go. Show the book. Meet the people.

Entering phase two:

Now there may be more showings in the works, some email contacts, some phone calls, coffee meetings for new work… all kinds of direct mail.

“Once a response form has been filled out, now is the time to engage in peer-to-peer discussions with the prospect. Start by building a relationship. Launching immediately into the BANT questions (Are you the purchaser? Do you have approved budget?) is a turnoff. First leverage the digitally collected information as a bridge to determine where the prospect is personally. Open-ended questions (rather than buttons on a web form) will accelerate this qualification process. What problem is the prospect trying to solve? Where does it hurt? What is going on in their world that triggered the need? What would be their perfect solution if they could describe it? Are they collecting information for a team? What’s their timeline they are working with? What information would you need from us to be considered as your solution? Great phone/social skills are a huge plus here. And for most Sales teams, the earlier your prospect is in the buying process, the better—it gives your team a chance to be consultative and influence the specs, thereby gaining the inside track. Once you have enough data to determine BANT, try to move the prospect toward meeting with a sales rep. As a result of this process, most real prospects will see the meeting as a mutual best next step, and that’s where most Sales teams want to be.

Read more:

The article above is relating to traditional sales, but there are some great points to be made in there. Read it.

Some say it takes 7-8 touches by a photographer before you get called back. Some say it takes ten or so.

I say it takes more than five and less than 1,247. (Note, if they haven’t contacted you after about a hundred, it may be time to pull them from your list and move on. But for those of you really, I mean REALLY committed, 1,247 is the magic number.)

So what counts as a ‘touch’ for a client?

  1. Portfolio review.
  2. Thank you note.
  3. Direct mail.
  4. Email.
  5. Phone call.
  6. Promotional item.

What may not count are tweets or RT’s, facebook “likes” or pinning their latest designs to your pinterest boards… seriously?

This is why making the process INTO a process makes sense. Have a way of working that allows you to think about the amount of touches you make with a prospective client. And keep them coming, as there can always be new images and things to share.

NOTE: Spamming them is as bad… no, it’s worse, than seeing them once and never going back cause you are all butthurt over not getting that $100K gig you wanted.

Consider what you think of as being too much.

Yeah… don’t do that.

Sales tools and automated sales software. I don’t use it. I still use a simple spreadsheet in Excel. And my trusty notebook. That is not to say you shouldn’t, only me confessing it takes so long to learn all the things about those software solutions that I lose interest too fast.

Been doing it my way for way too long… heh.

So let’s get real here for a moment.

You make a contact with an art director… this means you have a conversation with them. Whether email (OK, but not best) or a personal review (best) and then you start the count.

Show the book, leave a piece for them at the showing, send a thank you card (print?), send a follow up email (2 weeks or so) with another photograph attached. Then wait 6-8 weeks and send another email, and a direct mail piece. Repeat that until you have some new work to show. I count four ‘touches’ there… five with the follow up a few weeks out.

Numbers. Then…

Call for an appointment to show the new work.

Show new work. Send thank you card, follow up email… you know the drill now.

You are making new work, right?

Right?

Especially you guys who didn’t make the lousy 18 touches per week… it is because you were heavily shooting… right?

Riiiiigggghhhttt… :-)

Look, this is not the easiest profession you have chosen to go down. Not sure what that would be unless you like delivering pizza in your Nissan, but this one will wrap you up, chew you to a nub and spit you out in the time it takes that pizza to get cold enough to deliver free.

The winners fight for it. The winners put in the hard, droll, and sometimes messy work of doing what others don’t.

92% of sales people quit after the first ‘no-sale’ show.

Pathetic.

Be the 8%… it’s a numbers game.

Ten Free Photographs for Bloggers/Marketers

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PHOTOGRAPH ABOVE BY VIRGINIA SMITH: BRIANA AUSTIN AND DON GIANNATTI (NO LICENSE IS GRANTED FOR THE USE OF THIS IMAGE)

Briana and I spent a lot of time making photographs all over the country. We have decided to give some of these away to creatives who may want to do something with them. Our first freebie give away are ten shots from all over, and we have no idea what you all will do with the images.

But if you do use them, you must link back to this page, and give credit to Briana Austin and Don Giannatti. That is important and we have the following details for you to consider.

All ten images are in a zip file, and you are free to use them for any online use, even commercial.

You may use these images for online publications, websites, blogs or ezines.
You may not use them for print publications (we’re working on that for the future).
You may not include them in any collection or as part of another product that is licensed for sale (website template for instance).
You may not alter the photographs by any digital means other than to resize them for your usage. you may however, use them in designs with typography over them. Cropping is also allowed.
You may not refer to them in derogatory manner, nor use them in correlation to pornography, hate sites, or in any way denigrate the model. We are very serious about this.

Send us what you have done with the images on your blog or website.

READ AND UNDERSTAND THE LICENSE BEFORE USING THE IMAGES.

PHOTOGRAPHY LICENSE

BY DOWNLOADING THESE IMAGES, YOU ARE CONSENTING TO THE USAGE SPELLED OUT IN THE LICENSE.

Bri Don Image Giveaway #1 .ZIP

AND BE SURE TO LET US SEE WHAT YOU ALL CAME UP WITH!

It’s a Numbers Game, Part One

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How to Play “The Numbers” Game Part One

We have all heard the words, “It’s a numbers game” before. And most of us know what it means. In order to get to a certain level, more attempts than successes must be used.

Selling door to door is a numbers game. The more people a sales person talks to, the more they sell. It may take 10 “No’s” to get to one yes. So the goal is to get through those ten as fast as you can to get to the one yes. Knocking on ten doors a day nets one sale. Knocking on 50 doors nets 10 sales.

A ‘numbers game’.

Not much difference in photography, you know.

The more art directors you show your work to, the more chances you have of closing an assignment. The more times you interact with a specific art director, the higher the probability that a gig is forthcoming. The more gigs you complete with excellence, the more excellent gigs you get.

And yet…

I chat with photographers who do none of the above.

They don’t show their work. They don’t ever go back to someone who didn’t immediately hire them. They don’t get enough gigs to make delivering excellence count.

It is… a numbers game.

Of course there are a few givens.

Your work must be top notch. This is a given. All the door knocking and emailing in the world will not work as fast as good work will.

(Now this is where it gets crazy a bit. I think a mediocre photographer who has mad skills at marketing will do better than an ultra-talented photographer who sits in the studio waiting for the phone to ring.)

Why?

It. Is. A. Numbers. Game.

If your work is good, it all falls on you to do the work to get it in front of people who would buy it.

A lot.

Of people, that is.

We have discussed the ways we can find clients before, and how to think about marketing, but in this dispatch, I want to play with numbers.

I recently read where fewer than 80% of photographers spend more than an hour per week marketing. And only a few percent spend more than 15 hours a week marketing.

If we apply the 80-20 rule (20% of the businesses in a niche make 80% of the money) we can see that there may be, just may be a connection between not marketing and losing out on the bulk of the revenue.

We know this stuff works, and yet few of us can ‘find the time’ or ‘get ready’ or ‘bite the bullet’ or fight off whatever last minute resistance pops into our heads that prevents us from moving on this magnificent factoid: it’s a numbers game.

Let’s stop procrastinating and get to it.

The book is as good as it is gonna be for next week. The site is done, and the images up there are up there. Changes can be made tomorrow, but it is what it is and we move forward. If this is too fast for you, set a date. April 1? June 15th?

It doesn’t matter… set a date and keep that date.

We are going to begin by making three contacts per day, and sending out three emails per day. Three days a week.

We can pass on Mondays and Fridays as these are not traditionally good days for marketing. People are either planning for the weekend or recovering from it. Let’s give them some air.

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday.

Three contacts and three emails.

Six contacts per day x 3 days equals 18 contacts per week, 72 contacts per month, over 950 contacts per year. To see how that may affect your current status, figure out how many potential clients you contacted last year. Chances are it is less than 950… substantially less.

And yet we can do that with minimum effort. Three emails per day and three contacts per day is cake! It will take less than an hour – a lot less.

So what happens if we double that?

Six Contacts per day, and six emails. Just imagine.

Six contacts and six emails is 36 contacts per week, is 144 contacts per month. Nearly 1500 contacts per year.

What would that do to your business? What impact would that have on your income?

And how long would it take? Less than an hour a day for three days.

Go ahead, tell me how that won’t work for you. Go ahead and tell me that you are so busy not being busy that it is simply not possible to spend an hour a day MAKING YOUR BUSINESS successful.

I am not listening, but go ahead and try. You are only trying to convince yourself.

And really, you are the only one you must convince in order to get this change implemented.

At this point, I will sound a bit rude to some, and I really do not mean it to be rude. However, only you have the control over whether you play the numbers game or do not. Change from non-engagement to being engaged – or not. And in the end, it only affects you.

There are still lots of gigs to be commissioned. Lots of look-books to be shot. Thousands of pages of editorial and thousands of ads both local and national.

And here is another numbers game for you.

While the chances for getting a gig may be lower than they used to be due to the sheer numbers of competition, the fact is that there is a 100% probability that you will not get hired if they do not know you exist.

So here are a couple of questions for you.

Will you commit to 18 contacts per week?
Will you commit to creating an environment that will help possible clients find you?

Or will you simply let resistance take you off the grid?

I hope you never let resistance win. I really do.

Just remember…

It’s a numbers game.

DO THE MATH.

AWESOME Opportunity to be Exploited! Wow!

AWESOME Opportunity to be Exploited! Wow!

Crowdsourcing… that is the new name for spec work, but worse than spec work this involves an outlay by the ones being expected to be used for nothing.

FORMER ADVOCATE OF PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, Photo District News and Rangefinder have decided it is a great idea to have people send them money.

I mean, hell yeah… I like that. I would love to have people send me money.

Oh, you have to send some of your work in too… at $20 a pop. Seriously?

You are going to pay them for the opportunity to be turned down – and of course they keep the cash.

I wonder if they would consider it a good idea to crowdsource the editors?
I wonder if they would consider it a good idea to crowdsource the art directors?
I wonder if they would consider it a good idea to crowdsource the writers?
I wonder if they would consider it a good idea to crowdsource the advertisers?
I wonder if they would consider it a good idea to crowdsource the printing?
I wonder if they would consider it a good idea to crowdsource the distribution?

Yeah, I guess those would be bad ideas for – you know – a photography magazine.

But hotdamn boyhowdy it is a SUPER IDEA to crowdsource the photography – and get PAID to do so – which is the whole fkn point of the magazine to begin with.

What does this tell us about the people at these magazines that they feel they should be paid to look at the product they promote? Shouldn’t discovering new talent BE the reason for the magazine?

Or is it simply too much work to seek it out on their own. (Hey, there’s this thing called the internet, and you can find all… oh, never mind.)

Or perhaps it is those thousands of twenty dollar bills flooding in with the images. And we KNOW the images will get looked at, right? Right?

I am saddened and angry about this. it is wrong on so many levels I can’t even believe it.

Betrayed is the word that comes to mind.

And no, I won’t link it… you wanna enter, there’s this place called google and… oh never mind.

APPENDED BELOW:

The above is snarky… yeah, I can be snarky.

But instead of criticizing without constructive ideas, let me add this.

A Photo Editor (Rob Haggard) does this every week. His wonderful “Art Producers Speak” series presents new and exciting photographers suggested by art buyers in agencies.

FLAK does it too. They take submissions for their online site here.

So does Jorge Colberg at his Conscientious site.

Many online EZines also feature work of upcoming photographers. Sites like C-Heads and LadyGunn have plenty of emerging talent on display.

Some of these magazines have submission fees as well, but nowhere near the steep ‘pay-to-play’ fees of this proposed publication.

In these days of photographers being taken for granted, downisized fees, challenging market conditions and rising costs, it is very disheartening to see one of our own go this way. PDN and Rangefinder are publications that know what it is like for photographers out there. We should be able to turn to them for support, and call on them to be an ally.

“Crowdsourcing” is simply another word for “Spec” work. Something both magazines have taken a stance against. Something which most photographers consider working for free. Or worse when expected to pay for the opportunity to even get considered.

What would happen if ad agencies asked for a submission fee? Or magazines… want to see an AD with your book? Pull out your Mastercard.

Is that what we want this business to turn into? A feeding frenzy of self annihilation?

I sure hope not… but time will tell.

 

Off Topic Sunday…

Off Topic Sunday…

Been reading a really interesting book this past couple of weeks… lots to digest. “The Power of Visual Storytelling” by Ekaterina Walter and Jessica Gioglio is about how visuals are beginning to dominate not only our news and information channels, but the ways people interact with each other on many other social platforms.

If you are a photographer/designer, this is very good reading for you.

Pick it up for Kindle or in paperback.

Another book I am really enjoying is “The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth: Entrepreneurship for Weirdos, Misfits, and World Dominators” by Chris Brogan. If you are an entrepreneur in life or in spirit, this book is for you. I am most definitely all those things… and still working on the ‘world domination’ thing…

Also for Kindle and hardcover. I think you will really enjoy it.


 

Joe Sample passed this week. He was a pianist with a lot of charm, and I have many of his recordings. Funny how you can go back and listen to music made by people no longer with us. The power of technology that continues to surprise me.


 

Hey, did you know that Photoshop has a “Background Eraser”? Heh… this is pretty cool.

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This from Graphic Design Blender:

Freelancing is a legitimate business model, which means you need to treat it like a business. Here’s a brief look at the various roles you need to fulfil in your day-to-day operations:

  • The CEO – the person who does the strategic thinking and calls all of the shots.
  • The Designer – the person who actually puts in the work and ships client projects.
  • The CFO – the person who manages all of the finances for the business.
  • The HR Manager – the person who manages all of the people you bring in to help grow your business.
  • The Administration Assistant – the person who takes care of all of the emails, bookings, file management to ensure things are in order.
  • The Marketing Manager – the person who actively markets your business to ensure you always have new leads coming in.

There are 6 main roles in total, and in case you haven’t picked up on it already, you are all of these roles. I don’t want to freak you out, but this is the reality.

How we handle all these different rolls of our business persona is all important for the freelancer.

Read this important article here.

 

10 Instagram Photographers You Should Be Following But Aren’t

I love Instagram. I should use it more, but I get so caught up with writing and other things that it sometimes skips my mind.

However, I love following good image makers there and I am surprised that some of the fun photographers I follow are not being followed by many other photographers… what is up with that?

I think you should take a look at these folks and see their wonderful photos.

mmoorephotos on Instagram

Mike Moore @mmoorephotos

mirrormirrorxx on Instagram

Paola Thomas @mirrormirrorxx

tomastoj on Instagram

Tomas Jansson @tomastoj

coheaphotography on Instagram

William Cohea @coheaphotography

hiramchee on Instagram

Hiram Chee @hiramchee

katherinegooding on Instagram

Katherine Gooding @katherinegooding

simonwodwyer on Instagram

Simon Wodwyer @simonwodwyer

ireneliebler on Instagram

Irene Liebler @ireneliebler

tammybogestrand on Instagram

Tammy Bogestrand @tammybogestrand

rarerthan on Instagram

Shane Ernest @rarerthan

What About Critics?

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Should We Listen To Critics or Show Them The Door?

Ahhh… the world of the artist. A place where we can nurture our ideas and share our bountiful creativity to others who will accept it into their lives with open arms, and smiles of gratitude.

Or… not.

There seems to always be someone who doesn’t get what we are doing. Someone who finds it so desperately wanting as to cause them to sit at a keyboard and tell us that we are wrong… our work is wrong… our art is wrong.

“It’s just wrong, dagnabbit!”

And all this time, we were laboring under the impression that we were creating something that others would find appealing, not wrong. What does that mean anyway?

How can a piece of art, a photograph, a frame from our experience be “wrong”?

I will answer this in a few, so hang tight.

Critics. They produce nothing. They rarely know much about the art we create. They are usually not prepared for much of anything in the way of actually having much to say, rather it is the saying of that nothing that is their reason for being.

Now, I am not talking about critics who actually know a bit about the work, who delve into the motivations and the artistic goals of the artist, who can compare and contrast and understand the value of the work as it stands before them. There are a few of those out there, and while we may not agree with them all the time, we do know their knowledge runs deep, and that counts for something.

No, I am discussing the critics that are unsolicited noise brought to a higher volume with the social media frenzy of armchair experts. Followers of movements, online gurus, and phocelebs who create a frenzy with every “off camera flash” image they create. Being a devotee of someone else seems to be all that is needed to have permission to spew unrelated criticism of others work, or make judgements as to its value.

How we deal with this noise is important. Many budding artists have been sidelined by the nagging doubt as to their spot in the art world brought on by a casual remark on Facebook, or an unflattering note made by ‘someone on twitter’… and that, that is wrong!

A couple of interesting phenomena here.

Artists seem to give more weight to the negative remarks than the good ones.

Why? Why do we do that?

100 people see our image: 90 people like it, 8 people are non-committal, and two of them do not like it. One of those detractors adds a personal note like “This work is getting boring to me. I think you need to kick it up a notch or you will never be any good.”

Who does the artist seem to remember the most? Those ninety people who love it? Nope. The ones that didn’t? Nope… the one who decided to add a bit of criticism to the mix. The artist will focus on that one negative and bring themselves to a panic wondering if they really do need to ‘kick it up a notch’ even though no one on the planet has any idea what that really means…

How do we stop that from happening?

We stop it. Ourselves.

Having detractors is part of the way we know we are doing something right. No artist can please everyone. Avedon did not get every job he wanted. Spielberg has had to ‘sell’ himself as a director, and even the greatest actors around still have to audition.

The creation of art focused on the smallest common denominator usually produces art that is of no value anyway. If you want to make photographs that fly off the shelf at Walmart, you will be sad to find out that there are still those who will not buy them.

Detractors are not important. We simply stop giving them power. Know they exist, forget about any usefulness for them other than to remind you that you are not creating work for everyone.

And you shouldn’t.

The end of the ‘expert’ phenomena has not been of much help, that is for sure. People have gone through a lifetime of believing that every opinion matters, everyone’s ideas should be heard.

While that may play well in the skules, it is pure bullshit in the real world. An opinion that 4+4=9 is of no value, nor should we give accolades for being close. If I want to know why my refrigerator is acting up, I need not bother with my 10 year old daughter, nor the guy who sells slurpies at the QuikMart. I need someone who knows refrigerators. An expert.

Today, too many people think they are experts in photography. They are well versed in the lingo, have themselves an “off camera flash” and can ‘beat the sun’ for a cool looking picture. So naturally they have all that is needed to tell you what you are doing wrong. And they want to do it from the anonymity of the interwebs… safe from all retribution or inquiry.

STFU, dude.

If I want to get portfolio help, I will go to someone who I respect, who has similar sensibilities, who I can believe in for realistic ideas and motivations. I would not seek out someone who simply did not meet that criteria.

Nor would any of you…

So why do we even listen when the criticism is offered without our solicitation? Is a remark on Facebook telling us to ‘work on our processing’ really worthy of much attention?

If it comes from Rob Haggard or Selina Maitreya, then perhaps it is worth exploring. If it comes from someone who lacks the credentials and experience of those two, perhaps it is simply an opinion… and opinions are like… well, you know that line.

Opinions are not criticism. Opinions tell us more about the one who has it than of what they have an opinion. An ‘opinion’ that Avedon was a terrible photographer tells me more about the one with the opinion than it does about Avedon.

Stop confusing opinions with genuine critique.

A critique is something that you request. It must have parameters around it that indicate what the artist wanted to create what the goals of the work were and how well they think they accomplished that mission. Only then can a critique be given… with care and acknowledgement of those stated goals.

Critiques have value, opinions are are personal polls. And polls don’t mean much to artists, especially when they are a poll of one.

At least, they shouldn’t.

Lastly, those who love your work and what you do should be rewarded by your faith in them, your attention and goodwill toward them. Haters are hating on them by proxy. It is the detractors gift to themselves to turn someone who is a fan of yours into a non-fan. Giving the detractor fuel by ignoring those who care is not productive. Forget the detractor, pay more attention to your fans.

Let’s wrap it up with a small list, shall we.

1. When you receive an unsolicited critique, first remind yourself that it is not a critique, but an opinion. Ask what that opinion means to you or your work. Weigh it against what you know to be true, and dismiss it.

2. When you get an unsolicited opinion, investigate your detractor a bit. Click and see… do they have the chops to really give this opinion? Are they really worthy of the power they are trying to wield, or are they simply sharing their complete lack of tact and knowledge with you?

3. Understand that having detractors is a good thing. Nothing of value can please everyone. A photographer must create work that they love themselves, and not try to create a ‘one-size-fits-all’ image that will offend no one. Those images are used for picture frame sales and cheap calendars. And even then… heh

4. Know the value of your own opinion of your own work. If you believe in it, do not let someone who does not detract you from your work. Instead, let it be a force for creating more images that you love.

5. Turn your attention toward those who support you. The 90% of your followers, fans, customers who love your work. Don’t insult them by giving more weight to the detractors than you do to those who are on your side. Reinforce their commitment to you by ignoring those who are denigrating them by criticizing you.

6. And lastly… don’t let them win. Don’t let a week, small, petty person with nothing to do but try to make those who are actually out there doing stuff feel bad. Never give someone like that any power… not over you, or your work, or your fans and tribe… ignore them. And that is what destroys them the most. Not angry responses or tears of shame… ignoring them brings them the self awareness that they really have nothing to contribute, and they have even less power than they think they do.

Stay committed to your work, and be true to those who support you.

Have a great week, everyone. And tell the unsolicited critics not to let the door hit them on the way out.

“Since clients haven’t held me to the lowest bid, other things factor in such as how the photographer allots the budget. How much money is going into casting, scouting, model-making, travel? What kinds of fees are they looking for? What usage are they including?. The creative call/treatment are very important too. Are they connecting with the art director and how are they approaching the job? Are they (or their agent) flexible regarding any changes in usage or scope? Let’s be honest here, if I like working with their agent I am more likely to recommend them for the job.”

Read more

One Layout – Many Solutions: The SANDWICH

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The Project52 Pros knocked it out of the park with this assignment to shoot “The Infinitely Amazing, Always Tantalizing Sandwich”.

With layout provided, type in place on a layer, they had to shoot to the specs of the shot and keep it all perfect. That means the type had to be readable, and work within the layout.

When shooting to layout, it is important to consider those items furnished to be PART of the image delivered. You will see several ways the photographers used the shape of the typography to work with the image behind it.

The lighting ranges from full natural light, to multiple strobes, and the approaches are all within the parameters of the assignment. We give VERY strict assignment specifics on some of our shots, and they did well within those restrictions.

I am quite proud of these shooters.

assign-30-Gabi-Wright-Tues assign-30-jean-pierre-De-Rycke-Fri Assign30-Alicia-Bonterre-Tue2 assign30-Clare-Bambers-Fri assign30-katherine-gooding-p52ex-fri-2-02 assign30-katherine-gooding-p52ex-fri-2 assign30-nicole-fernley-tues "The English Afternoon Tea Sandwich Collection" by Sam Breach 20 Fri--Assign-30-Incredible-Sandwich---J-Chatzkel sandwhich-assign tomas-jansson-assignment30... tomas-jansson-assignment30. tue_assign30_anders_eriksson
Assign-30-Carol-Rioux

The Image Is The Thing

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Becoming a “Photographer” – or being a “Photographer”… what does that mean, really?

Does it mean that you now have a top of the line camera? Does it mean a bag of lenses? Does it mean an awesome set of studio lights? Or a light meter? Boom?

Storbs? (inside joke, sorry)

Nope. Sorry, none of those things mean a damn to whether you are a photographer or not. What matters is that you make photographs. Images. Snaps… whatever you want to call them.

And that is ALL that it means.

And the emphasis for photographers is the making of and viewing of their images. The goal line is the image. The product is the image. The whole enchilada is the image!

And I am not sure that we are all on the same page with that.

Look, I love to ‘make’ images. Working with lights, being in the studio with booms and stands and all that those tools entail is a thrill. I love to work on making a photograph.

But it is the photograph that is the ultimate thrill. The image that was created, not the effort that went into its creation.

I remember being at a workshop with Bret Weston. It was an exquisite time for me… 8×10 Deardorff and a stack of film holders at the ready. We were at a small beach near Carmel and it dawned on me that we were where Edward had made some of his most incredible images.

We spent time looking first. Before anything else, we looked. We looked in order to see. Before we make the image, we have to “see” the image. That ability to find the photograph in a full 360 degree scene is quite difficult when you are used to only looking through the camera when taking photographs. And we were asked to ‘see’ as a camera in order to find the image we wanted to make before seeing it through the camera.

I will say that the ability to do that was not won on the beach that day. But it indeed was won over several years of shooting and seeing and seeing then shooting. I look at the world much as a camera would now before bringing it out into the world.

I still refer to it as pre-visualization, although Ansel Adams rightly noted that was a term that was redundant. Visualization is what it was. To add the ‘pre’ was to allude to the visualization twice.

No matter, I am stuck in the redundant of the redundancy of pre-visualization so if you hear me say that at some point, you can be aware that I am aware of the redundancy of saying it that way. Sorry, Ansel.

The goal of the visualization is to take the camera out of the equation for a bit, and be deliberate in the choices to be made. Of course serendipity arises, and one can certainly make changes with the camera at the ready, but in many ways the deliberate choice becomes the correct choice over time.

We become the master of the tools, not at their mercy. We choose to make the photograph we see, not the photograph that simply appears in the viewfinder.

In other words, a photographer is a photographer even without the camera, because they are always visualizing the photograph that would be taken.

After a wonderful morning at the beach in Carmel (which included a berating from Mr. Weston with the most colorful choice of four lettered terms) we returned to the studio to process our images.

I had taken eight sheets of film with me, and had managed to expose only four.

Processing and printing took a little over two hours and the rest of the afternoon was spent pouring over each of the students work. My berating still stung, but the subtle compliments paid me by Mr Weston took most of pain away.

Imagine a workshop where the taking of the images is but one small part of the day, and the viewing of, dissecting of, criticising of, and joyously immersion of the imagery was the greater.

We talked about composition, and compared images to see how putting the subject in different areas actually gave it different contexts, and different relationships to the surroundings.

And different relationships to the viewers. We looked at how exposure could change the mood of the shot as well as create an emotion – intended or not.

Framing, light, shadow and viewpoint were discussed in length. We spoke into the night and slept with dreams of images, tripods and Dektol…

I would suggest such a workshop today would be somewhat difficult to sell. The emphasis in many circles seems to be more on other things, the taking / making of the image, not the image itself. “How do I do it” becomes the main question when “what will I end up with” should be.

There are noted exceptions of course. Jorge Colberg’s wonderful Conscientious for one. I do not always agree with him, but he always makes me think about imagery. And thinking about photographs, looking at photographs and understanding photographs is what a photographer should do when not actually making photographs.

I think, anyway.

John Szarkowski wrote a book entitled “Looking At Photographs” in 1973. This was a seminal book for this newest of art forms. I suggest you pick up a copy and spend some intimate moments with great photographs (at least taken previously to 1973).

Looking at Photographs: 100 Pictures from the Collection of The Museum of Modern Art

Here is a link to some clips of Szarkowski discussing many of the contemporary and modern photographers featured in the book. It is well worth an hour or so of your time, believe me.

No discussion of camera gear can hold a candle to the actual examination of the images produced by those cameras.

The image is the culmination of all that we experience in our lives, and how we bring those experiences into the medium of the photograph. The photograph gives us context for our vision and we give the photograph its own context with our experiences.

Shared experiences and personal experiences are the basis for the extraordinary image that we strive to make with our cameras. Whether they are iPhones, P&S’s, ‘grampacams’ or extraordinarily expensive professional tools, the end product is a two dimensional ‘glyph’ captured with the personal context and values of the photographer.

The most successful of them are created with a deliberateness that is unfathomable to most beginning practitioners, even if they are shot in an instant of a moment. The seeming grab-shot can be as deliberate an image as the most deliberate tripod mounted view camera shot.

The long practiced synapses are simply firing quickly, and the vision is the driving factor. The time it took to make the shot is of no consequence to the emotion it evokes in the viewer.

The image can stand on its own.

I love photography. I love photographs even more.

If I could no longer make them, I would immerse myself in the best of them made by others. They are precious to me. Always have been, and I see no waning in my intense love affair with the photographic image.

How about you?

Look at photographs. Print photographs. Put photographs all around you. LIVE with photography. Live as a photographer.

It sure is an interesting life.

From This to That

THIS-TO-THIS

PHOTOGRAPH BY ALICIA BONTERRE

One of the recent assignments at Project 52 PROS was to make the worst photograph they could make. The assignment was designed to make the students think about what makes a good photograph in order to negate that in order to make a terrible photograph. You can see the assignment here.

Alicia Bonterre turned in a perfect example. The image of the bottle and the glass on the left were not staged. Simply set down and shot. She then worked her magic on the image to the right. I think this would be a very good way to show clients the power of what you do as a professional photographer. Think of some ways to show before and after shots that educate and inspire your clients.

McGunn Media turned in this image. flowers   Catherine Vibert shows a badly conceived portrait and then a lovely one with wonderful light and context. sidebyside

What Do You Charge For… Part Four

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What is the value of a photograph?

(What Do You Charge For...   Part 1Part 2 Part 3 /)

Seriously… what IS the value of a photograph?

If you need a calculator, go ahead and get it… I’ll wait.

What’s that… you need more information to make that calculation?

OK, sure… well, let’s see… it was taken on an old Nikon, with a manual focus lens on black and white film. I am not sure of the shutterspeed, but the aperture looks somewhere between f-5.6 and f-8, and the image is a bit blurry in some parts. Oh, and it was taken in a little village somewhere.

How’s that?

How about this one then… a color photograph of a martini glass in the sand with a pyramid upside down in the reflection of the liquid. Shot on location with a MF camera on a tripod at a bit of a wide aperture, normal lens, natural light. Shutterspeed unkown.

What… you cannot tell the value of the photograph from all that information? And you think it was a trick question too?

Oh come now, gentle reader… would I trick you?

One more… color shot of a baby laying on a maroon towel in window light taken on a P&S camera from above. Not sharp, not remarkable. (BTW, the value of that one is priceless. It simply is.)

There is value to a photograph. And finding that value means we have to take important considerations in mind when making that call.

A photograph generally carries two values. One is given to it by its creator – you, the other by its value to others. A photograph can be priceless to you, but of little value to others. The baby shot I described is the first photograph I made of my first born on her first day at home. Priceless to me – meh snapshot to you.

Eddie Adams

A grainy black and white shot taken in little village may mean little, unless it is THE grainy black and white shot taken of a South Vietnamese Policeman executing a captive with such a seeming cold bloodedness that it could be considered one of the seminal moments that turned a nation away from war.

One single frame on a roll of Tri-X. And a nation was sent reeling.

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Bert Stern:

An up and coming photographer was hired to do some creative work for a small, very new company wanting to introduce a Russian drink made from potatoes to America during the height of the cold war.

Stern wanted the image to be iconic of the “Driest of the Dry” indicating the very dry Vodka Martini. He also insisted on shooting it on location, in Egypt. And he held his ground.

The ad is considered to have opened the doors to the little Vodka company, Smirnoff, a $5.5 Billion dollar company today.

xxpyramidpureblue_photobybertstern_1_1

So let’s see… at the time it was taken it was a single image on a piece of Ektachrome, value $.40, then it became an ad shot which launched a new product worth billions. It is now an image that stands alone and is for sale at Christies for $4000.

Pyramid shot at Christies

Valuable photograph? Or still a frame from a roll of film.

The value our work has is many times dependant on the value it represents for someone else. Can you imagine Stern considering his shot worth $4? That is serious markup for a 40 cent image (materials). Let’s say he throws in travel and such… and it comes to $1500.40. Tacking on a comfortable margin of 50% he adds another $750.20 to the image.

Silly?

For a shot that helped a company increase profits by millions?

Silly for sure.

The value of our work is tied to the values we place on it and the values our customers place on it – combined.

Take one of your favorite shots and find an out-take from that shoot. Is it of much value to you? Perhaps you don’t like the expression of the subject, or the background is a bit out of focus… whatever, you did not choose it.

Cool… now let’s say I see it and ask if I can use it.

You ask me what I am going to use it for and I answer I want to blur it and use it for the background of a banner for my new personal website.

What is the value of that image now?

Well, it’s a personal website, and we are friends (we are friends, right?) and I let you know that I am happy to pay you $50 for it. Do we have a deal?

Probably. From a value of 0 to $50 – not bad.

How about if I exclaim that I am knocked out by that image… that it is the most perfect image I could have ever thought of for launching a new line of Jimmy Choo shoes. In fact, I want to build an entire campaign around that image, and our ad budget is $17,000,000 for North America alone.

Still worth $50 to you? We are still friends… so why would it be worth more than what you quoted me for my personal use banner?

BECAUSE IT IS!

It will be representing a 17milliondamndollar ad campaign. If they are thinking about spending $17M on ads, they are planning to make a BILLION.

And that image is key for that to happen. It has value. A lot of value.

A hell of a lot of value.

Now how do we understand that value as we begin working with people who want to give us their hard earned money for our hard earned photographs… and create a win-win situation?

(HINT: Win-Win situations make happy photographers and happy clients that like to work together.)

We research and learn. What is the image being used for? How will this benefit the client? How much is the client worth? How much will this image mean to them at the bottom line?

Hard questions… made harder by a lot of people in business who don’t have any idea how important good photography is, and how it can help their bottom line. We can try to educate them, and we can look for clients that do indeed know the value that great work carries.

Educating the client to great work, and why it matters could be done in person, or in the proposal you make… showing the value you think great work provides by demonstrating it.

Clean, neat and professionally presented proposal.
Clean, professional logo.
A professional website.
A professional portfolio.
A professional set of working documents (Rights/Releases/Business Forms)
A professional demeanor and being professional in your presentation.

I have seen proposals on dull, uninteresting emails. I have seen websites that are subdomains of the same website my 10 year old daughter used for her “My Little Pony” website. I have seen slovenly produced books and business forms that were right out of Microsoft Word.

And they want to tell me that the visuals matter? Apparently they have not understood their own message. Walk the talk, folks. Visuals matter… to us as well as them.

I think that mood boards are also an important tool when working with clients who may not understand the value of the work and how it relates to the bottom line effectiveness of the communications you are working on.

(What about the people who don’t want to meet with us, or only want an answer via email? Well – then send them a well designed email with some links to previous work, a set of links you have for similar work (high end) and a justification for them to use you OVER and above the dollar sign attached. You know, most others will never do that… help the client understand the value and you stand out. Even if you are too expensive for them now, they remember the value you added, and the fact that you are a premium brand.)

A mom and pop simply may not have the big bucks to spend that an ad agency would spend for a franchise. They will also see much smaller gains in real dollars, although the percentage of increased value may be the same. You must price accordingly.

Scenarios:

Author calls you for a headshot for his new book. The book, an E-Book is his first, and he is putting it on Kindle at a price point of $2.99. A schoolteacher by day, he is a hopeful Science Fiction author with a new blog and big dreams. He lives in your area and would come to your studio for the shot.

Author’s Public Relations firm calls for an author headshot. They need it for the back cover of his 10th novel, and want North American and European rights for a usage period of two years. Paperback rights will be negotiated when the time comes. He lives in your area and will come to your studio for the shot.

Same bid? Not hardly… one could be a $150 – $200 shoot and the other a $10,000 shoot. You will have to figure out which is which.

A local pet groomer (two stores) wants some photographs of happy owners and their pets for her website, and possible use on some ads in the local / regional magazine. You would be able to be totally creative with the images, as long as they would fit her vertical format. Estimate 4 hours for four portraits. You are on your own for the shoot.

A national pet store wants some shots of happy people with their pets. You can be totally creative with the people you shoot, but must stay within their vertical layout. You will be joined by the Creative Director, Art Director, copywriter, and Client Rel from the agency as well as a VP of marketing and his assistant from the client side. You will need a stylist, a MUA and a digital tech. Oh, and each of the talent is coming with their ‘handler’ as they animals are well trained. Estimate 4 hours for the shoot.

Will these shoots be priced the same?

Of course not. But where they fall will be as much research and ‘gut’ feelings as you can muster for the first one, and a bid program like BlinkBid or assistance from someone like Agency Access for the latter.

Welcome to the wonderfully nebulous world of foggy inaccuracy, gut decisions and seemingly pure guesswork – pulled from thin air – that is bidding commercial photography. I have seen bids vary by tens of thousands of dollars… and one time the bids ranged over a hundred thousand dollars difference.

So we are back to that question?

What is a photograph worth?

Depends a lot on you and your client reaching a mutual understanding based on the knowledge that the image will help do what they want to do.

Sell more stuff.
Get more clients.
Increase awareness.
Recruit better employees.

It is up to you to make a photograph that does what it needs to do, striving to make it the best it can be and comfortable that you are doing the best job you can for your client. And the true value is derived from doing just that.

I hope you have enjoyed this set of posts on bidding and charging for your work.

ALL FOUR INSTALLMENTS IN ONE DOCUMENT:
If you would like a PDF copy of this entire series, you can download it here: What do you charge for… a PDF Ebook. Please do not copy the information in any way, but be free to share the document without changes or modifications.


“In The Frame” is my weekly dispatch covering lots of tips and interesting points of view for emerging photographers. Some articles end up on Lighting Essentials, and some of them are only for my newsletter subscribers. No Spam, and we never give names to anyone.



Does the Best Photographer Make the Most Money?

humboldt

rocks

Have you ever thought to yourself that as soon as you get to be the best photographer in your area, town, city, state, region, country, universe or whatever, you will be the highest paid?

You may be in for a shock – but that ain’t how the game is played, my friend.

The “Best” photographers are not necessarily the highest paid. And for now, we will not approach the obvious question of who defines “best”.

Here’s our thought process:

  1. We get some awesome gear.
  2. We learn to light very well.
  3. We take pictures that are pretty good.
  4. We start out business.
  5. Our photographs become instantly “professional”.
  6. We get more money because our work is better.
  7. We get huge accounts because of our outstanding portfolio
  8. We have to hire people to take care of all our cash.
  9. Choosing the right Grecian tile for our mansion foyers is time consuming.
  10. Celebrity friends invite you to lavish parties.

Yep. That’s it right there.

Except its not.

In a perfect world, we would be hired on our work alone. If we show what the client likes, we get the gig.

The plain truth is that while the work indeed matters, other considerations may actually take the lead and determine your ability to get higher paying gigs.

Considerations like;

  1. Can you deliver the job correctly?
  2. Can you solve the problems the job presents?
  3. Will you be needing more handholding than the other photographers?
  4. Do you understand the concepts?
  5. Can you communicate your vision and link it with the clients?
  6. Do you focus on the job at hand?
  7. Can you make it happen – no matter what challenges come your way on the gig?
  8. Are you personable and helpful?
  9. Will your work, attitude, personality, ethics and reputation be something the client will like?
  10. Will you make the art director / creative director look good because they chose you?

There are more, of course. And for individuals, some of these considerations matter more than others.

If we can focus the client on the work that must be done, how we do it and how well it will benefit their project, we can possibly win the job and get paid more money. Because we are not putting ourselves into the mix – we are putting the job first. The client first. We are there FOR THEM.

Other photographers can bid and send in lovely drafts and colorful PDF’s (as we can as well) but we add that extra/different approach of personalizing the response to focus on the job, project, assignment. We move the needle from being one of a group of people bidding, to THE person who is on board to help them sell their vision.

Yeah. It’s subtle, and it is not a guarantee – but it is something that will differentiate you from the pack when asked for a bid.

Some bids go out and they are looking for the cheapest ‘vendor’ to make the photographs.

We want to change their intension from going cheap to getting the best visual solution they can, and that means US. And US costs a bit more than the average ‘vendor’.

Being the “best” photographer is no guarantee of success. Best is an illusion, or a whimsical attachment at most. Being RIGHT for the job – in the clients mind – is far more of an important goal. One we should focus on at every opportunity.


“In The Frame” is my weekly dispatch covering lots of tips and interesting points of view for emerging photographers. Some articles end up on Lighting Essentials, and some of them are only for my newsletter subscribers. No Spam, and we never give names to anyone.



“This Boring Old Photo…”

“In total, it took roughly two hours to get a single correct frame. I made every mistake you could make. I forgot to pull the dark slide out so I had at least one totally blank sheet of film. I forgot to dial the aperture back down after focusing so I significantly overexposed at least one shot. I would get the lines right and then get the focus wrong during the adjustments. I got more frustrated and more determined with every wasted sheet of (even then, really expensive) instant film.

I was on the second to last sheet in my box of film when I got the result you see above. It’s still not perfect, but, at the time, I was thrilled with what I got when I pulled the sheets apart. Not only did I see the (mostly) straight buildings, but I saw all the work I had just put into it. I saw a process that made me slow down and think about what I was doing. I saw all the things I still had to learn about photography and all the things I already knew.”

– STAN HORACZEK

Steve Pamp: Tintypes of Gravestones: Colorado Front Range

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pamp-1

Steve is a photographer in Colorado, and a Project 52 Alum. These photographs were taken during a summer project covering the Front Range of Colorado and the grave markers in the old cemeteries there. Steve chose to do these photographs on dry tin type, a very old process,

pamp-2

See Steve’s full story, “Marble in Tin”. and a lot more photographs at Exposure.

Steve’s website.

More on the tin type process here.

 


“In The Frame” is my weekly dispatch covering lots of tips and interesting points of view for emerging photographers. Some articles end up on Lighting Essentials, and some of them are only for my newsletter subscribers. No Spam, and we never give names to anyone.



What Do You Charge For… (Part Three)

humboldt

pole

Working and bidding for small businesses and entrepreneurial startups.

(What Do You Charge For… Part One / Part Two)

Mom and Pop businesses, self-employed artisans, service providers, entrepreneurs and all of the small businesses that are the lifeblood of the economy are a major source of revenue for commercial photographers.

There are simply far more of them than ad agencies or large corporate entities. And they all need photographs, brochures, menus, portraits, catalogs, web banners and editorial for content on their sites.

Pictures… they need a lot of pictures.

However, unlike Ad agencies and corporations, small businesses may have a far tighter grip on finances and budgets and that will always affect how we handle and work with them.

Expecting the same kind of budget you would get from an agency to shoot for Audi, for a car detailing franchise in Kentucky is not only not realistic, it makes no sense to the customer as well.

We take those things in mind when we are bidding for small business, and I am going to share MY views on this process. They may diverge a bit from conventional wisdom, but I diverge from conventional wisdom many times. Conventional wisdom said we couldn’t run a 6 minute mile. Conventional wisdom was we would never get to the moon.

My take:

Here are __ things I take into consideration when bidding and working with small businesses.

1. They are generally frugal, and want the maximum bang for the bucks they spend. I want to accommodate that within the constraints of understanding that I TOO am a small business and must make revenue and profit to stay in business. (In fact, I have used that simple factoid on occasion and been met with signs that they didn’t even think of that… yeah, we just have fun with cameras and stuff… heh.)

2. I know that some of the ways I work with media companies, ad agencies, PR firms and corporate communications may seem foreign to them. I do not think it is my job to try to educate every person on the planet about copyright… hell, we cannot even teach JUDGES about copyright, so I rarely try. I do however hold to some basic – and non-negotiable – tenants for dealing with usage.

3. In many cases they are looking to the photographer to provide much of the creative thought that a designer or art director would have brought to the shoot. This can be fun and it can be excruciatingly difficult… sometimes at the same time. (Project 52 photographers are getting a heavy dose of that situation, as it is so vitally important to master.)

4. Keeping it as simple as possible is a good thing, as is not bringing in negative influences that can worry them, or take them from a buyer to someone who finds working with you too difficult. When they go buy a refrigerator, they own it. That stack of brochures they had printed are theirs, and they like to know exactly what they are getting when they buy something.

So let’s address these from MY perspective.

The first thing I do when approached by a small business is to do a little research on them. I use a new-fangled thing called the internet. And it can be a lifesaver when dealing with small businesses.

I look for their website to determine what they have already. Are these professional photographs taken locally or were they hired out of the area? Are they stock images? Are they stolen from the internet? Google image Search makes this task a lot easier, AND they are perfecting it every day.

If they are stolen off the web, or stock I have two ways to go. I can bring this up to them during the pre-bid process to find out if they are even aware of it, and I can deduce that they have in the past not had a nickel for photography. (I could jump to the conclusion that they do not respect photography, but then they did ask ME for a quote… so I hold off on that judgement for now.)

If they are images from photographers that they have hired regionally or locally, I check out that photographers site to get a feel for the quality and professionalism of the work, and to get an idea of what the charges would be. A high end photographer generally has a high end looking website. (What does your website say about you? Wait, different article. Sorry.) This can also open you to make the inquiry, “I see you have used Aper Ture’ as your last photographer, what can I do to make sure you want to continue to use me after this engagement?”

Yes. Ask them how you can not screw up like ol’ Aper did, as they are NOT using him this time. This is a valid and often used question in sales, so do not ignore it.

You now have a pretty good idea of what they have spent in the past, and what they did or did not like about their previous shooter.

You can use this information to help you form your bid.

Before I get into a “Usage Rights” discussion with them, I look very carefully and closely to what possibilities there are for usage. I do not want to open up discussions of something potentially confusing if there is no need.

Let’s take a mom and pop restaurant that is having some new menus made, and they want to use the images on their website. I know they are not currently nor are they planning on any TV commercials (cause I asked them when I was preparing the bid… “what do you want them for, and will you be using them on TV?” to which they responded with a laugh that they didn’t have that kind of ad budget.)

Ask. Answers are cool and useful.

I know they are going to use them on their menus, and when asked they said they like to change the images on the website every 6-8 months.

So I am not going to add a bigass “rights” clause that discusses usage for a year, and extending it for two years, and how many hits the site gets and if they are going to use them for their inhouse newsletter (10 copies) or any other crap. And remember that they said they want to reshoot every 6-8 months – and I want those gigs too.

I know, pretty much KNOW, that they are going to be using them for menus and website for a year. I simply state in the contract what they are getting the images for, and let it go at that.

Bringing up the issue of copyright is always a good idea, and the way I do it is to INFORM them that as a service and a protection to them I copyright all the images, and give them the sole license to use them… and I guard their unauthorized use by anyone else so they don’t have to worry about it.

See what I did there…

I then ask to see what they are looking to create or re-create. I know they may not have an Art Director, but they do indeed have an idea in their minds on what the images should look like, and I need to know what that is. We MUST come to an agreement on the creative direction BEFORE we commence shooting.

You wanna have a disappointing experience… right here is where you can make that happen by NOT nailing down what, where, and how you are going to produce the images. And be understanding and patient as you go through the process. They know how to run a restaurant, but they are not marketing gurus, creative directors, art buyers or award winning graphic designers. They need some photographs that look sorta like those they saw on…

Yeah. Cool… let’s look at those for a moment.

If they are expecting styled images in a lovely natural light courtyard, they better have that courtyard. And if they don’t you must be ready to offer alternative places and be ready to explain why there has to be a change. If they are not going to have a stylist and they do not have a courtyard, they must understand what would be better… and that is YOUR job on this gig.

Explain it to them with patience and grace. Show them alternatives, tell them why that will save them money or time and will look better. Most people are not stupid. Trust me.

Offer solutions, not roadblocks. A photographer standing there going “We can’t do that, and we can’t do this, and I don’t see how that can happen” is not very exciting or engaging.

“Hey, let’s look at this area… I think if we bring in some…” is far more engaging. And it positions you as the creative on this project. You are the expert, and the solution maker.

If it happens that during this part of the process, the client becomes self absorbed and disparaging of your every attempt to work within what they have, graciously bow out.

If it is a bad mix at the beginning, it will never get better. In fact it will be fuel for more infuriating situations down the road.

Been there. Done that. Sucks.

Preparing the estimate/bid should be as simple to understand as possible. I have seen some contracts put out by organizations that are full of “party of the first part and party of the second part will seek arbitration to include but not necessarily exclude the third parties interest in and monetaty investment the first party…”

Bullshit. I wouldn’t sign it, and it would raise red flags all around me if I was that restaurant owner. I want some photographs of my “Signature Salad” and I get a contract that looks like I am purchasing land in Bolivia.

KISS – Keep It Simple, Stupid… Yes.

However, not so simple that they do not understand what is going into the gig, who is responsible for what, and how payment is expected to be provided.

I line item everything I can – even if there is N/C… it is important that they take those things into consideration when bidding the next gig, and it is my subtle way of educating them as to what it costs to do this work.

I insist on a deposit. Non-negotiable (except for rush gigs from long-time clients). Trust them? Sure… but trust is a two way street, right?

In fact, I expect a member of their business to be present at the shoot. That person is contractually responsible for approving what is being done. That person has to be one with the power to approve the work, and not a go-between. And if they are not going to provide that person, then they AGREE to have me be the final arbiter of all imagery. Done.

In fact here is my short list of non-negotiable practices.

  • I will always get a deposit.
  • I will always work with the responsible party (or a contractually designated responsible party). That means that someone will be there to sign off on the images, and if that doesn’t happen, they OWN what I shot and will pay for it. Period. (I get sign off while working on each and every shot if there is a client representative there, and that representative has to have the power to sign off.) Ignore this rule at your peril.
  • I expect to be paid in 30 days or less. It is in my contract. I demand it. Sure, there are exceptions, and they are in writing.
  • I own the copyright for the image, but will license up to unlimited and exclusive usage. If they want the copyright, then they will pay dearly for it. A LOT of money. (Yes, I can be bought. Not proud, just honest.)
  • I have the right to show the work in any and all of my promotional materials and for any educational / editorial work that features me. (Barring embargoed dates and contractually agreed on third party usage.)
  • If the owners/stakeholder is ‘too busy’ to devote any time to my questions, I walk.
  • If I don’t feel good about the gig, for whatever reason, I walk.

I also deliver what was expected and a little more, on time and on budget. I hope you do as well.

Putting together a bid for any kind of photography gig can be fraught with challenges and what if’s… and that will probably never change. Knowledge is power. Going through all the different things one must do in order to present a consistent and winning strategy for a bid is a lot of work.

It is. So?

BTW, it also helps to have a full understanding of what things cost, and an idea of what you should charge before charging in to the bidding process.

How’s about we talk about that next time? Cool.


“In The Frame” is my weekly dispatch covering lots of tips and interesting points of view for emerging photographers. Some articles end up on Lighting Essentials, and some of them are only for my newsletter subscribers. No Spam, and we never give names to anyone.



Are You a Commodity or a Brand?

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brookeBrooke from way back in the day… can you spot the ‘brand’ we were inspired by?

Why Thinking of Yourself as a Brand is More Important Than You Know

There are brands and there are commodities.

A brand is something or someone that people choose because of what they associate with the item – what intangibles that choice brings.

A commodity is something or someone that people choose because of price point or availability. Cheapest or easiest to get is what they go for.

A brand is not interchangeable, but a commodity is.

Cans of peas are commodities, Green Giant Peas are a brand. Some people will pay more for Green Giant Peas than any of the other brands. And if the store is out of Green Giant, they will happily take ANY of the others on the shelf – they are commodities.

Leica is a premium brand. Mention the name Leica and photographers instantly focus on excellence, vision, longevity and high value. Even people who are not photographers will perk up when they hear the word Leica.

There are dozens of other manufacturers of cameras – and each have their aficionados, but Leica can command high respect EVEN from the Canon, Nikon, Fuji, and Sony shooters who are also aficionados and fans of their own brands.

Looking for a premium bag, we may think Prada. There are other brands that we may think of, but Prada is Prada… and there is no substitute for that brand.

If we think about the bag as a commodity – not a premium, then almost any bag from any department store will do the job.
The Prada bag was not chosen ONLY because of its ability to hold things without them falling out. It was chosen because of what is associated to it, what makes it unique IS its brand uniqueness. It is better made, classier in style, more innovative or classic or whatever. It is a Brand that people associate with the bag.

The bag from the department store is utilitarian. It holds things without them falling out just fine. It comes with no other associations. One bag is totally interchangeable with another.

As a photographer, one of our most important part is our ‘brand’. If what we do is totally interchangeable with another photographer, or even a group of photographers, then the value becomes less, and the loyalty is simply not there.

Start to think of yourself as a total brand.

  • What you do.
  • How you do it… differently.
  • What values you bring.
  • What you value your own work to be.
  • How you deal with prospective clients.
  • What your visual strategy looks like (identity/graphics/website)
  • Does the visual strategy enhance your brand?
  • Will your clients be able to discern your value?
  • How do you deal with clients to introduce and enhance your brand?
  • How do your customers see your work – as a brand or a commodity? Don’t know? Ask.
  • If they see you as a commodity, how do you change that view?
  • If they see you as a brand, how do you enhance and engage that view?
  • Brand can include your images of course… that is a given
  • But also how you show the images: your portfolio, leave behinds, identity pieces
  • What your website looks like – Is it modern and cool, or a free crappola site
  • What your logo looks like. Is it professional? Does it speak to your brand?
  • Where you show your work. Do you have an office? Do you have a co-work space? Is it a local Starbucks?
  • What you wear when showing your work. Do you dress casually, formally, hip, classic, contemporary, eclectic?
  • What you wear when you are shooting. Does it match your work, how you showed your work, and what you think of the work?
  • What you wear… period. All three should match… and that gives you memorability.

Style, personal style, can go a long way toward building a brand.

It is why rockstars all look ridiculous… they do it to be remembered. It is why actors and actresses do outrageous things in public… to be remembered.

Do you have to do ridiculous and outrageous things while looking like a throwback to the Village People? OF COURSE NOT.

But you do have to maintain a style, a look, a personal brand that elevates your work from commodity status.

Here is the scary thing… if you are a commodity – an easily replaceable, easily interchangeable photographer – you will have a very tough time in a crowded market. It will come down to a buck cheaper or being the only one available that day. And that does not make for a career that builds.

A Brand photographer – YOU – is someone they want to work with because they want to work with you. Budgets are not a big deal (within reason) and the focus is on getting the best person (you) for their ad shoot, or brochure assignment. They WANT to work with YOU. You bring more to the experience than just great images. You bring integrity, values, wacky playfulness, serious classic styling, a relaxed working atmosphere, an intense working atmosphere… whatever it is that makes you – YOU.

Time for a personal assessment… look above at the list of statement / questions and answer them for yourself. Write them down. Answer them honestly and with no censorship – only you are going to see them.

Are you a brand or a commodity?

Knowing this will really help as you make decisions regarding your work, your fees and who you plan to work with as you begin to build your business.

Ideas on how to go from a commodity to a brand are plentiful, and I will offer some suggestions in the upcoming weeks.


 

ANNOUNCEMENT

I am very happy to announce that I will be working very closely with Robin Bramman on business branding and personal branding. We are planning on doing a workshop online for branding your photography business as well as yourself. It will be a free workshop for all of you LE folks, so watch for the announcement. Coming up soon. Visit Robin’s site for more on what she does for large corporations and entrepreneurs alike.

I will let Robin introduce herself here.

MEET-ROBIN-copy

“Hello, I am Robin, Lead Curator + Strategic Brand Partner at RobinBramman.com.

 

Think of me as your Brand Partner for your digital presence – with personal and business branding expertise, strategic planning skills, social media savvy, project management and group branding implementation insights, and straight-from-the-trenches entrepreneurial wisdom.

 

I’ve logged over 20+ years as a visionary strategist + interactive services project champion (translation: fine-tooth comb detail-wrangling for smooth-as-silk fully branded website launches). I am super collaborative and have a host of partners I call upon to take your brand from ZERO to launched.

 

Throughout my career, I’ve worn high-powered hats in corporate America in both healthcare and financial industries, owned + operated my own brick ‘n mortar clothing boutique, successfully flipped + sold real estate properties, and dropped it all to be a stay-at-home mom. I’m a big fan of personal evolution, breaking as many rules as possible, and building a POWER team to support your branding initiatives.

 

I hold advanced master branding certifications through Reach Communications Consulting, Inc. and am a part of an exclusive enterprise team that allows me to deliver comprehensive learning programs for individuals, group branding sessions and deliver personal branding keynote and corporate workshops in support of brand building for the organization.”


“In The Frame” is my weekly dispatch covering lots of tips and interesting points of view for emerging photographers. Some articles end up on Lighting Essentials, and some of them are only for my newsletter subscribers. No Spam, and we never give names to anyone.