The assignment was to shoot Brussel’s Sprouts. Anyway you want.

Some people do not like Brussel’s Sprouts, and some people love Brussel’s Sprouts. Couldn’t find anyone who was ambivalent to them. Either love ’em or hate ’em.

The image above is by Karen Green who really, REALLY hates Brussel’s Sprouts. She focused stacked a surface of sprouts being trampled by the women’s shoes. It is the focus stacking that makes the image seem a bit surreal. Our normal view of a scene like this would have some depth of field drop off, but she kept the entire image in focus and it adds a layer of interest to the image that rocks.

Anne Stephenson took a humorous approach to the idea of a gumball machine that gave out Brussel’s Sprouts. Two lights on the side and a special on the hand give the dispenser a bit of an otherworldly look. Keeping the light lower than the subject adds to the mystery.

Rick Savage takes a very moody light to his recipe shot. This point of view makes the parts of the image seem a bit unrelated and with a strange relationship. The dark, moody light was created by a single softbox over the set.

James Kern likes to use fire in his images, and the Brussel’s Sprouts challenge was no exception. A photographer must be very careful when doing images with fire, as it can tend to go where you don’t want it to go.

This is a single glass with water / lighter fluid set ablaze and a sprout dropped into the glass. James used mirrors to get the different views of the glass, fire, and dropping sprout.

We can safely put Matt Moriarty in the ‘hate sprouts’ camp. In this image, the hero would rather sign a confession than eat Brussel’s Sprouts. Heh.

Judicious use of snoots / grids and good styling brings the image to reality. The use of the dark background gives it an air of mystery as well as foreboding… and then there’s those damn sprouts!

Kurt Moore specializes in light painting. This image is the culmination of many different images painted with his flashlight/modifiers to give the image a most unique feel.

Kurt lights each part of the still life separately and then assembles them in a composite of layers that are revealed and hidden to give the image its special look. This is difficult and tedious work, and Kurt does it very well.

PROJECT 52 HAS BEEN A LAUNCHPAD FOR HUNDREDS OF
PHOTOGRAPHERS OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS.

THE TRADITION CONTINUES WITH A REBOOT.

ENROLLMENT STARTS SOON.

SIGNUP HERE FOR NOTIFICATION.

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