Josh Ross on Marketing and the Life Cycle of a Product Shoot

My friend Josh Ross and I got a chance to talk a bit about marketing and project life cycle of a product shoot. This was an invite only (Project 52 members) and you will hear some questions at the end of the webinar. This is NOT a flashy look at photographs webinar, it is a listen and learn webinar.

Find Josh at his website and these social media places.

Twitter

Facebook

LinkedIn

Google+

Flickr

Here is the previous discussion with Josh and me.

Perfume Shot To Layout

At Project 52 last week we had an assignment to shoot a specific image of a perfume bottle. You can see the assignment here.

These are some of the great images the students shot for this assignment.

One Light Portraits: A Collection

The assignment was to shoot a portrait with one light.

Studio Portrait: Clean background, Simple Light; Forceful, Expressive Portrait

Specifics:

A very clean portrait shot on a flat field background (wall, seamless, cyc, material, cloth, canvas…) Tightly focused and stylistically within your style. This image should be created to show how you handle strong personalities in front of your lens.
There should be special attention placed on the expressiveness of the portrait: Sadness, pain, angst, joy, humor, intensity… ENGAGED.

We want to see more than a smile, more than a beauty shot. This is a glimpse into the soul of the subject.

It is important to make the lighting something that enhances the look / feel of the subject. Whether it is soft or hard, single light or multiple strobes, natural or mixed or whatever, the light and the subject should be something that makes sense – to you.

To me, one light is a way of presenting a subject free of the hand of the photographer. A light is a light, and the subject has a relationship to that light that is in many ways more organic than when additional lights are added in. Of course, I am referring to lights on the subject, not background lights or ambient or location specific lighting.

This week the August group took on the “one light portrait” challenge:

From This to That

THIS-TO-THIS

PHOTOGRAPH BY ALICIA BONTERRE

One of the recent assignments at Project 52 PROS was to make the worst photograph they could make. The assignment was designed to make the students think about what makes a good photograph in order to negate that in order to make a terrible photograph. You can see the assignment here.

Alicia Bonterre turned in a perfect example. The image of the bottle and the glass on the left were not staged. Simply set down and shot. She then worked her magic on the image to the right. I think this would be a very good way to show clients the power of what you do as a professional photographer. Think of some ways to show before and after shots that educate and inspire your clients.

McGunn Media turned in this image. flowers   Catherine Vibert shows a badly conceived portrait and then a lovely one with wonderful light and context. sidebyside

Steve Pamp: Tintypes of Gravestones: Colorado Front Range

canyons-trip
pamp-1

Steve is a photographer in Colorado, and a Project 52 Alum. These photographs were taken during a summer project covering the Front Range of Colorado and the grave markers in the old cemeteries there. Steve chose to do these photographs on dry tin type, a very old process,

pamp-2

See Steve’s full story, “Marble in Tin”. and a lot more photographs at Exposure.

Steve’s website.

More on the tin type process here.

 


“In The Frame” is my weekly dispatch covering lots of tips and interesting points of view for emerging photographers. Some articles end up on Lighting Essentials, and some of them are only for my newsletter subscribers. No Spam, and we never give names to anyone.



Old Mama Dog – New Tricks…


“I am changing the direction of my photography as I shoot more film. Overall I hate my own results but I love the work itself. I’ve been all over the place trying to figure out what type of photographer I want to be when I grow up. As I get older I realize the small moments are just as powerful as the big ones. It’s been a long time since I’ve been a kid and yet I’ve never been more of a kid than right now.

So I’ll keep taking every kind of photograph like a kid in a candy store til the sugar high wears off, throw up or learn what kind is my favorite. Pretty sure it’s all about being human whether it’s in New York or my own little corner of the world.”
Virginia Smith