Eric Muetterties: East Bay Commercial Photographer

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Meet Eric Muetterties, a working photographer in the East Bay area of San Francisco.

I met Eric 4 years ago at a workshop in North Carolina, and we shared a plane coming home. His attention to detail and love for the medium made me think he could actually do this crazy business. Adding that he really understood business made it all come together.

Eric started out wanting to shoot people, but has ended up as a studio still life / product photographer. Working mostly with direct customers, he has built an exceptionally strong client list and shoots 4-5 days a week in his Dublin studio.

Eric is still a relatively new shooter, but doing very well in a competitive market. I attribute that to his skills as both a photographer and a business person.

Eric feels he owes his success to an acronym he calls COPS.

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Consistency | Opportunity | Persistence | Stamina

You will hear him discuss it on the video. I think that is a very solid set of traits for anyone considering this business, or any self employed business that you can think of.

Links:
Eric Muetterties Photography Website
Eric on Linked In

Some of Eric’s Images:

A video Interview with Eric Muetterties.

A big thanks to Eric for spending some time with us and sharing a lot about his work. Visit his site and drop him a note if you like what he does.

Eric reminded me that he would love to recommend this book for anyone considering becoming a photographer:

If you are interested in the “No Fear” last edition of Project 52, visit this page for more information. We will fill this group very quickly.

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Irene Liebler and Sandy Connolly: Starting the Journey

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Irene Liebler was one of the Project 52 members from a few years ago. She did the course twice, I believe and rarely missed an assignment. She also rarely did an image that we were not blown away by. Irene is a consummate artist, and a painstaking perfectionist when it comes to making the image she sees in her head.

She is also a commercial photographer in a small town near Hartford, Connecticut.

Her partner, Sandy Connolly is also a photographer who also does business development and produces many of the shots they do. Together they are the “Hurricans”… you just have to think about that one… heh. And they do their work together at Super Nine Studios.

Links:
Super Nine Studios Website
Super Nine Studios Facebook Page
Twitter
G+
Blog

As you know, the world of commercial photography runs the gamut from highly creative approaches to providing the client with exactly what they want. Irene and Sandy do just that – providing a creative pallet when needed, but also capable of creating the working commercial photograph when it is appropriate.

Some examples of the work Irene and Sandy create at Super Nine Studios, Connecticut.

A video interview we did for you is here, and Irene and Sandy discuss their unique working arrangements, how they got started, what is happening now and plans for growth in the coming months/years. They also share a few of their assignments with you as well as provide a few tips for those just getting started.

 

We will be presenting more of the Project 52 members who have successfully made the jump into professional commercial photography all month.

I am doing Project 52 one more time; I call it the “No Fear” edition and enrollment is now until the end of June, or we get 100 students whichever comes first. (At this point, registration has been open to the public for 24 hours and we are over half way there.)

See this page for more information or to enroll in Project 52 Pro – “No Fear” – we start July 1.

Thanks for visiting.

24 Frames In May

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Begins today.

It’s a non-contest, and just for fun.

Not many rules, but a few guidelines:

  1. This is for film cameras only.
  2. Black and White or Color is fine, and there are no restrictions on the type of film you shoot.
  3. Polaroid is OK.
  4. 4×5 or sheet film cameras are OK.
  5. Tintype / alternate process is OK.
  6. Images must be on a contact sheet as well as individually presented (Use Photoshop’s excellent “Contact Sheet” tool if you have had your film scanned.)
  7. Only one roll of 35mm film (or the first 24 frames of a roll of 36)
  8. Two rolls + for 6×7 120/220.
  9. No more than three exposures taken on any single day, no more than two of any single subject.
  10. Images must be presented in order of exposure.

Uploading instructions will be posted on May 31. Upload from June 1 to June 15.

If you are planning on being involved, let us all know in the comments.

Submissions will include:

  • Contact sheet
  • Camera format / brand
  • Lenses used
  • Film type and name
  • Lab used (with link please)
  • 24 individual frames ready for web at 1000 pixels on the long side.

Here is a link to last year’s submissions. I am hoping for triple the involvement this year.

Considering an option for a contest… thinking more about it and will announce before May if you can choose to be in the optional contest.

Need a film camera? Here is a list of my favorite film cameras. Let me know if you think I missed any amazing cameras. (Yeah, I gotta ad the Olympus OM-1 soon…)

I recommend this lab (FIND Labs), but you are welcome to use any lab you wish.

(photo courtesy death to the stock photo)

8WEEK-BANNER


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Project 52 Project: Incredible Egg (Shot to Layout)

The layout was furnished and the photographers had to shoot to a fixed set of parameters. Size and position of the type could not change.

Nicole Fernley: Cookbook Project

Project 52 members sharing recent work.

Nicole Fernley:

“These four images come from a larger selection of images that I recently shot for The Cheese Lover’s Cookbook, so the common thread is, of course, cheese. The cookbook author made most of the food, and we worked together to style the shots—and sample the food. Bonus. I was grateful that Don had said over and over “Shoot to layout!” because I had the sense to ask for image size. Finding out the images were expected to fill an 8×9 page was extremely helpful—limiting, but helpful.

This set is probably not as personal as Don had expected for this final assignment, but I’m submitting them because they represent something important to me—my first paying commercial photography assignment. At the beginning of Project 52, Don had said he hoped everyone would get at least one paying commercial gig before the Project was over. I was pretty sure I was going to be the exception because I had so much more to learn than everybody else. Surprise! I got a gig. And it kicked my butt…but I learned a lot.”

Nicole Fernley Photography

David Price: Illustrated Proverbs

David Price:

“This project grew out of some recent discussions about drawing inspiration from anyone, anything, and everything around you. I admit, I drew a lot of inspiration for this idea from Irene Liebler’s series she did across last year of Common and Idiomatic Phrases – Feet To The Fire, Leaving The Nest, and so on. I thought that idea would be something I could do in my own style. I love her work, but I don’t see the world the way she does, and that’s a Good Thing™. I love that, having seen it week in and week out, we can all take the same subject and come up with completely different results.

I am doing this idea of taking old proverbs, common phrases, and idioms because it will lead to some interesting photographic possibilities, and be expandable far beyond a 5-10 shot series. I like this personal project for me, specifically, because those possibilities can extend through all of the artistic forms I enjoy working with, from portraits to still life, composites, and a whole lot of concept work. Heh, concept work: This was the area I really wanted to concentrate on for this last P52 project, as I see it as needing the most development in my own artistic growth going forward.

I hope you enjoy the series. I did!”

David Price Photography (Bay Area, CA)