A WordPress Plugin for Photographers

A Kickstarter for Photographers to LOVE.

My friend Jon Mathers is a photographer / programmer down in Perth, Australia. He and I were chatting about some new and better tools for photographers using WordPress, and Jon decided to build a small suite of tools that I thought were missing. We started with a mosaic gallery, and a horizontal scrolling gallery that are quite hard to find in a lot of themes.

(Demo Site) – and as one of the beta testers, I can say there is a LOT more coming than is visible here. This Plugin is amazing and filled with little gems that will be exciting for commercial AND consumer shooters.

We then thought it would be cool to add a document area for keeping track of items we may want to keep together for projects.

BAM… he was off to the races and this plugin has been growing and growing and will be an amazing tool for photographers. The Project 52 members are beta testing it and so far loving it. There are few – if any – similar plugins out there.

Here is what it has in the suite as of this morning. I am running it and will attest that it all runs great.

Masonry (mosaic) gallery.
Horizontal scrolling gallery. (Editorial shooters love them)
Before / After tool for showing images comparison (one over the top with a reveal slider)
Panoramic Viewer for ultrawide photographs
Print Gallery: Create a selection of images that can all be printed on one sheet for a client. Also allows the client to take out images they don’t want. Great for proofing or providing a prospective client with a take-away.
Projects: Gather notes, documents, images and links for all sorts of assignments and personal projects.
Contacts: Create contacts and label them for jobs/leads/prospects as well as what kind of contact they are (Art Director, Designer, Editor etc…)
Products: These can be hard products (prints, framing) or virtual fees (day rate, per shot rates) that are created and maintained by you. Perfect for creating quick quotes when you need something fast.
Quotes (Bids): Import the contacts, attach the products, add as many vendors/suppliers/rentals as needed and out comes a quote ready to print.

With this arsenal of tools, a photographer can become real serious about their business and work my suggested “Three Contacts Per Day” method easily and effectively.

Jon is working quite hard on this Plugin to get it ready for full implementation. I know he has spent some out of pocket and will incur some additional costs when he brings in some PHP pros to make sure the whole thing works perfectly and meshes together well. (It does now, bu he wants to make sure his code is up to snuff… he is a perfectionist in this stuff.)

I know you will love this WordPress Plugin, and his Kickstarter is quite modest in what he is seeking (enough to pay the PHP crew).

PLEASE take a look and help him – and yourself – with this great plugin.

WORDPRESS PHOTOGRAPHERS BUNDLE (KICKSTARTER)

New Portrait Workshop: Environmental Portraiture (SECTION 2)

ENVIRONMENTAL PORTRAITURE: 8 WEEK PORTRAIT WORKSHOP III

SECTION TWO: LIMITED TO 20 STUDENTS

Technical Approaches To Portraiture

We examine environmental portrait lighting techniques from seven of the world’s best photographers. From natural light to blended natural and artificial light, students explore each technique as they apply it to the weekly location/environmental portrait assignment. 

Posing Techniques for Portraiture

Learning about how the world’s top environmental portraitists work with their subjects help photographers find and develop their own methods. Studying the images, re-engineering them and finding out how to present the subjects as they do adds more tools to the process.

Photoshop Integration for Environmental Portraiture

Each assignment also includes appropriate Photoshop techniques for the student to explore – from Frequency Separation to creating ethereal and emotional lighting effects, we have gathered the best tutorials available for each weeks workshop.

Explore the Work of 8 Environmental Portraitists

Each assignment features the work of a contemporary or modern photographer and provides the direction for the shooting assignment for that week.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT THE WORKSHOP PAGE.

8 Week Portrait Workshop III: Environmental Portraiture

8 MASTER PORTRAITISTS / EIGHT MASTER INSPIRED ASSIGNMENTS

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT THE WORKSHOP PAGE.

8 Week Portrait Workshop III: Environmental Portraiture

Ten Things to Remember As You Begin Your Photographic Odyssey

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Ten Things to Remember As You Begin Your Photographic Odyssey

I stopped doing what I was doing and began to be a photographer one day. I had been around photographers, but I didn’t have any clue what being a “professional” really meant. I simply started out as a photographer, then learned that I needed to assist first, then hit it again as a photographer. I made a lot of mistakes. I went to the School of Hard Knocks for undergraduate and “Mean Streets, U” for upper grad work. I learned from the seat of my pants, and took a lot of risks… some paid off kinda good, some didn’t work out at all, and a few hit big time for me.

But when I talk to a lot of photographers who are starting out, they have a false idea of the business. They don’t understand the focus needed, or that it may be kinda damn tough for a while. Sacrifice means they may cut back on cable channels, or get a 15? MacBookPro instead of a 17″.

Right.

I have ten principals that will keep you going when you start out. I wish I had known about them when I started out. I know they work for me now as I start yet another company in a down economy… heh.

Here we go…

1. You are going to have to work harder than you do when you work for someone else. Got that? Let me say that again – You will be working harder at being a photographer than you will work if you keep your corporate, or other kind of ‘employee’ gig. It isn’t up for discussion, and you better damn well be prepared. No one is going to be watching your clock, that is up to you. There is no one who will be telling you to get up earlier and stay up later… you will have to do that. Work is good. Work is healthy. You will be good and healthy when you are moving toward a successful photographic career.

NOTE: If working harder than you are working now doesn’t appeal to you, go ahead and skip the other 9… take a nap or something. It really ain’t no big thing. Photography as a career may not be right for you.

2. You can never give up. You can never give up. You keep at it until you have NO other way, then you find another way. I don’t care about what challenges you have, you must not give up – ever. Even when you want to (we all want to now and then… believe me, it will pass), you keep going. It takes years to get this thing going on… so be prepared.

3. Sacrifice will become something that you become familiar with. Maybe you move into a smaller apartment, drive a used car, eat macaroni and cheese a bit… trying to live the life of a successful photographer while you are scrapping along makes no sense, and will drive you to ruin faster than most anything else you do…

4. …except spending too much money on gear you don’t need. Rent, borrow, marry someone with great gear… just don’t spend all of your capital on a lens you use now and then. Make a detailed list of what you need… go ahead, we’ll wait. Got it? Good, now trim a third of that… there ya go. I am a photographer – I know what my list would look like… heh.

5. There is a reason you are a photographer. Find it or keep looking till you do. Some call it a vision, some refer to it as a calling. It is YOUR defining work. Shoot and shoot and shoot some more until you find that special work that is YOURS. Then keep at it until other people know what it is you are doing. You will know when you connect with your vision… you can feel it. Do not let anyone else take you down or sway you away from your own vision.

6. You are gonna screw up. And you are gonna screw some things up pretty bad. So f’n what? Everyone fails at some point. It is what you do after the screw up that makes that failure critically dangerous, or greatly empowering. Did you learn from the screw up? The answer better be yes. Will you screw up like that again? Answer there better be no… emphatically no. Learn from your fail, get up, dust yourself off and keep going… (see #2 above).

7. No matter what, death is not on the line. You are going to be a photographer, and work really hard, and fail occasionally… but it wont kill you. You will survive the screw up, the short month, the fourth meal of mac and cheese in a week, the used Toyota… You. Will. Survive. People will tell you that you are crazy and it isn’t worth it… that’s what people do. Tell them thanks, and keep on with it. You will survive. And you will grow, and one day look back and be able to tell others about your struggles… and no matter what, you will embellish to make them sound even worse than they were when you were going through it.

8. Wake up in the morning and be happy, grateful even, that you are doing what you want to do. Sure its hard, sure it has its challenges… but it also has its rewards. And it is what you want to do – well, need to do really. You wake up a photographer and you get to make photographs. That is soooo much cooler than what you were doing, right? And we know way too many people who hate their jobs. They wake up and count the days to the weekend… we never really work a day in our lives, but we are engaged at a level most will never be. 12 hour days or longer? No problem. We are photographers, in charge of our own destiny, and doing something we can love.

9. Don’t sit down. Don’t get cocky. Don’t let a lazy day stretch into two. You are in a race, a competition, a driving force of creativity that is pushing you – and others – to get the work. One hit isn’t a career. (Remember Christopher Cross? Yeah, neither do I – look him up.) Letting up gives the ones that are drafting a chance to gain the lead. Now, look, I am not saying that you need to be petal to the metal and fiercely competitive and never ever have a moments rest. I am not saying that… I mean to say that it may feel that way. You must learn to deal with constant competition, constant need to grow and constant irritable distractions that make it harder to keep going.

Keep going.

10. Do it all out. Do it full on. Give it ALL you have, then dig down and find a bit more. You know that silly marketing thing – 110%. Yeah, that is really mathematically impossible and totally irrational in our business. In this business you give 115%… get it! And love love love what you are doing. It feels so much better, and it gets easier when you are going big. Really big. As BIG as you possibly can.

I know you have heard some of these before, but we rarely hear them in schools (they are afraid if you really know what it will be like, you will quit and they wont get their money). We rarely hear them in the forums because so many in the forums have no idea of what they are talking about. And many times those that do don’t get heard due to the noise level of the naysayers. Sometimes they are simply busy doing it, so really don’t have time to argue with those who think they read something somewhere that a guy said his brother’s girlfriend once heard…

Get out there. Shoot shoot shoot. Build a business. Don’t quit. Learn from your mistakes and keep moving. Tell the naysayers that you are too busy to hear them tell you about not being busy.

And love what you do everyday for a change.

 

Catherine Vibert Delivers Social Media Headshots

Catherine Vibert Delivers Social Media Headshots

P52 Alum and member Catherine Vibert explains the necessity of having a perfect headshot for Social Media. This kind of client centric marketing will create an interest in those needing to have the best headshots they can get. And – that is EVERYBODY on social media as a business person.

Well done Catherine.

“Social media and marketing collateral formats are not a one size fits all thing. You will need to be able to crop your pictures to fit Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, About Me, and any other myriad of social media outlets. This is my speciality. I shoot with cropping in mind. To get the most bang from your buck out of one single headshot, it needs to be shot to be chopped. I made a little collage of various crops from the same picture.”

See how she did the magic at her website.