A Few Spots Are Open in the Upcoming Workshops

8 WEEK PORTRAIT WORKSHOP ONE

One of the most popular workshops we do. This is an intense, shooting workshop where we study the work of 8 top level photographers to learn what they do, how they do it and why.

MORE INFORMATION HERE

Be sure to watch the video on the page.

8 WEEK STILL LIFE WORKSHOP

The students who take this class tell me they learn so much about shooting still life that it changes their approach to photography. An intense, but totally fascinating look at shooting inanimate subjects.

MORE INFO HERE

“Body and Soul” a New Book by Boudoir Sensation, Susan Eckert

MEET SUSAN ECKERT, BOUDOIR PHOTOGRAPHER

AUTHOR OF "BODY AND SOUL" ONE OF THE BEST PHOTOGRAPHIC BOOKS I HAVE READ

Meet Susan Eckert, a photographer in Long Island, NY specializing in intimate portraiture of women. (Blog)

Her new book, “Body and Soul” is one of the best photo books I have had the privilege to read. It is a wonderful mixture of artful images, and real down to earth business advice for anyone wanting to start a photography business – whether boudoir or not.

Susan’s background in psychology is super interesting, and she brings some wonderful insights into how clients and boudoir photographers relate. This info is not found in any other book I have ever read.

I LEARNED A LOT!!! (And I have been doing this for so long it really does have to be a new idea to get me interested.)

Eckert blends solid business and marketing advice with a wonderful set of interviews with clients, past clients and even a few other photographers. This presents a super valuable read for anyone who is in business, wanting to start a business or possibly struggling in business.

If you are one of those photographers, you will want to purchase two copies. One copy for your bookshelf and one copy to mark up, highlight, post-it-note the hell out of. This is your guide to a successful launch of your business.


AUDIO INTERVIEW


GALLERY

An Interview with Photographer LaRae Lobdell, Florida

INTERVIEW WITH LARAE LOBDELL, FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHER

ONE OF THE BUSIEST PHOTOGRAPHERS I KNOW!

MEET LARAE LOBDELL

For those who may not know, LaRae started her career in the Seattle area, and is now living in the Miami area. She has been a host on CreativeLIVE, shot many musicians and artists, and is now working with Polaroid University on a project to teach photography to beginners and intermediate shooters.

Recently she was in a very bad car accident, one that may slow most of us down. LaRae powered through it and is really back at it 100%. She is an inspiration for many of us.

I caught up with LaRae and we had a nice chat. I hope you enjoy the interview. She takes us through some of her images in the second half of the video.

“Failure is an essential and inevitable part of success.” – LaRae Tweetable.

LaRae’s Website

LaRae’s Blog

LaRae on Instagram

LaRae Lobdell Contact


 

8 WEEK PORTRAIT WORKSHOP ONE

One of the most popular workshops we do. This is an intense, shooting workshop where we study the work of 8 top level photographers to learn what they do, how they do it and why.

MORE INFO HERE.

8 WEEK STILL LIFE WORKSHOP

The students who take this class tell me they learn so much about shooting still life that it changes their approach to photography. An intense, but totally fascinating look at shooting inanimate subjects.

MORE INFO HERE

A Beautiful Promo

My bud Dave Siegel sent this to me. I think it is very powerful. Showing the before shot next to the final image makes the package more informational as well, and provides the viewer a glimpse into what Dave can do for them.

Email promotion.

siegel

Deconstructing a Portrait

I want to take a closer look at some of the portraits the students in the 8 Week Portrait Class are doing. Decontructing an image is a very valuable exercise and one that can garner much insight into the way the portrait was conceived and produced.

The image above, by Leonardo Ferri, is of a young woman at the rose gardens in Berkely, CA. Usually a place teeming with people and other photographers, and especially so, it was nearly deserted on this cold, overcast day.

Using the steps and the hedges as a grounding point for the image – a contextual pallete – he placed his subject in the middle of the steps and then moved a little to the side to bring the angles of the image slightly askew, and giving her a bit more of a dynamic position in the image.

Leonardo-Ferri-anootated

The placement of the subject is directed by the angles of the parts of the image. The placement of her face is in nearly a perfect spot.

Photographer Iryna Ischenko used the tall gates and cypress trees to frame her subject. I personally like this photo for so many reasons. The leading lines of the brick roadway, the brooding sky and those lovely, tall cypress trees. The subject seems to be moving through the gate, and her gaze is down. All other elements are focused upward while she gazes down. I think this makes the portrait quite intimate and hints at a narrative unknown.

Photographer Gabriel Alvarez worked with his wide angle lens (part of the assignment) to create this powerful, yet understated portrait. Simple elements for the subject to lean on, and a single light from a speedlight was the effect he wanted to use. Gabriel told us he really struggled a bit with the wide angle lens and used a cropped area of the frame to keep the wide angle distortion from being too much for the image. Since our inspiration this week was the great Jean Loup Sieff, I think Gabriel did very well.

The expression is a moment caught in time and we are not privvy¬†to what is happening. The wardrobe, a little black dress, adds to the minimalistic setting. Everything is black or white.¬†Carmen Blike, the photographer, used the V shape of the stone work as a base for her composition, then used the subjects legs as an inverted “V” above them. The light is a single diffused speedlight above the subject and blended to be just a bit brighter than the ambient.

This image, by Diana Lundin uses the geometry of the setting to drive the eye toward her subject. It also seems to isolate her, while making her the obvious hero of the shot. All lines lead to the subject here, and instead of appearing overwhelmed by the huge architecture around her, the pose makes her seem confident and in total control of her environment.

Linda Luu Kieff used a graphical shaft of light coming in from the window on right to highlight the face of this nude portrait. The angles of the light bring our eyes to the face and the textures of the environment help the subject stand out. The smooth skin of the subject is in full contrast to the dark, rough material of the lounge and the patterned background. Working in the dark tones like this can be very tricky, but Linda handled the exposure very well. The image has a feeling of film to me, although it was shot digitally.

One more from the set by Linda Luu Kieff. This nude shows a different angle and how Kieff worked with the window light, and the bars/panes of the window to play the light across her subject. This play of light, and the anonymity of our subject prove to be a narrative that begs explanation. None is forthcoming. The gentle tones of the image are very film like, and keep the viewer intrigued by carefully retaining the shadow details to play off of the skin of the subject. Ballet shoes add to the story, although we don’t know why.

Annely Silferwax¬†used two softboxes from either side for this nude portrait. Camera right is turned up a stop and a half over camera left, and provides the impetus for our subject to be looking off toward it. The dynamic position in the¬†subject with the careful placement of the cloth makes this a very powerful image… one the subject seems ready to leap from. Annely used a very contrasty post-processing to be reminiscent of high-speed film when pushed. The subjects regal expression, and subtle dynamics provide a stunning image.

Photographer Frederic Reblewski used the stripes on the jacket as a compositional element. Notice the painting (hung on seamless paper) that mimics the lines and colors of the jacket. A large single light source gave him the look he was desiring, and a natural feel to the portrait.

With the subject leaning way into the photograph, and into the light from the bay window, Photographer Duane Middlebrook used line and texture to set his subject off from the background. I love that bright outside contrasted with the dark patina of the inside walls. The pensive look of the subject makes the portrait more intimate and personal.

In the wilds of the mountains, and on an overcast day, photographer Marjorie Decker caught this portrait of a fellow hiker and companion at a moment of rest. The gentle light and shallow depth of field help the portrait keep a more personal feel.

An intimate, spontaneous feel to this portrait is due to the careful use of props and background. A single speedlight is aimed from camera left, and it is flagged off to provide the raking light on the flowing background behind the subject. The simple wardrobe and sparse table setting give the image a bit of mystery. Photograph by Richard McDonald

The image on the right by Sherrie Von Sternberg is whimsical, playful, and quite a candid moment. The use of overexposure, and the shadow line, as well as the brave and dynamic crop, makes the portrait quite evocative. I like it.