Behind the Image: Pour Shots

Behind the Image: Pour Shots

The assignment was to shoot a pour shot, and the P52 members really stepped up. These four shots caught my eye not only because they are really fun but because their approach and setups were quite well thought out.

I hope you enjoy the little critique and BTS shots by these wonderful photographers.


VIDEO

Erik Weaver

Frank Grieger

Michael Klinepier

Rick Savage

Behind The Image: Selections 3-12-17

Behind The Image: Selections 3-12-17

I chose nine images to look at today. These were all gathered from recent Project 52 assignments, and I think you will find them very intriguing.

Project 52 introduces photographers to the real world working environment of assignment photography. The challenge of shooting to a layout, or making a mundane product look cool is part of the working photographer’s environment. If you are interested in Project 52, or taking the workshop (it’s a year long… heh) come on over and take a look. www.project52pro2016 is the place.

INTERVIEW: DAVID HARRY STEWART

INTERVIEW: DAVID HARRY STEWART

David Harry Stewart is a photographer that I have been following for many years. His work touches every point in my aesthetic list, and it was a super treat to speak to him last Tuesday.

David Harry Stewart

Website

Instagram

Behance

Ageist


Visit David’s site to see many more images. And visit Ageist too. I think it may become a super valuable resource.

 

 


PROJECT 52 2017 IS ENROLLING SOON

PROJECT 52 HAS BEEN A LAUNCHPAD FOR HUNDREDS OF PHOTOGRAPHERS OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS.

THE TRADITION CONTINUES WITH A REBOOT.

ENROLLMENT STARTS SOON.

SIGNUP HERE FOR NOTIFICATION.

Behind The Image: Still Life

Behind The Image: Still Life

The assignment was to focus on textures and patterns for backgrounds or surfaces.

These photographers created images that blended texture / subjects together to make images that are compelling and draw the viewer in.

Let’s take a look at the images.

Barbara Schweighauser created a beautiful still life, complete with compelling light and a moody presentation.

Barbara used a large light source in very close but at low power for a soft presentation. Barbara determined that the light needed a bit of a kick from the right side. Adding a fill card gave the ambient a bit more shadow detail, and the mirror gave a small, crisp edge to the side.

Greg Pastuzyn chose a shot of lemons, with lots of added textures on both the surface and the props.

Using a scrim with a softbox behind gave the textures dimension. A fill card up front balanced the shadows out. You will notice that Greg uses a scrim for the main light, and a continuous light behind the scrim. Continuous light is a very inexpensive source for doing still life work. Since the subject is rarely dancing around, longer shutter speeds can be used. Consider a set of inexpensive continuous lighting for making still life imagery.

Lavanya Reddy wanted a deep-toned image with detail in the subject matter and background.

A large softbox in close, with a fill card for shadow detail gave soft highlights down each side of the items. A fill card opens up the shadows to bring the ambient contrast down. But even with the lowered contrast from the fill, the texture is brought out and we can almost feel the slate and peppers.

Lily Dale chose a lot of different textures to reveal in her subject and a used cutting board for her background. From the liquid smooth coffee already brewed, to the coffee grounds the textures of everything allows the viewer to get a sense of what the ingredients must feel like.

Lily chose a soft box above the set, and removed the grid. She then added a white card for fill on the front, and a black card to give a negative fill (add contrast) to the left side of the image. This helps the sugar be seen down to the granular level.

Phil Kirshmeier’s image of fasteners and an old tool shows some great texture.

Phil uses a DIY scrim to give the ambient exposure and clean highlight on the tool, while his speedlight with a grid and snoot on it gives some great texture to the screws in the foreground. Building a nice scrim for still life is neither expensive nor difficult. I think you can see from Phil’s shot that it can be made with very simple materials.

Liz Carmel used a very soft side light to present the differences between the smooth tomatoes and the rough-hewn wood.

Placing the softbox behind two large scrims gives a distinctly soft lighting with a lovely soft specular highlight on the efficient tomatoes. As you can see, the scrims are very high, and by doing that the light actually wraps around the subject and creates a very soft edge to the shadow. And the shadow is far less contrasty than it would be if the light was smaller and not as tall.

Ivan Singer’s still life give the subjects several highlights to draw the viewer in. Many times the creation of multiple highlights will make the viewer stop and check out the textures.

As you can see from the lighting shot that he used four different lights to create the different highlights that ring the plate. The multiple highlights create a very interesting image. Whenever there are multiple highlights it creates a visually different image from what we normally see.

PROJECT 52 HAS BEEN A LAUNCHPAD FOR HUNDREDS OF PHOTOGRAPHERS OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS.

THE TRADITION CONTINUES WITH A REBOOT.

ENROLLMENT STARTS SOON.

SIGNUP HERE FOR NOTIFICATION.

Interview: Jason Scott Montoya: Path of the Freelancer

Interview: Jason Scott Montoya: Path of the Freelancer

I had the pleasure of interviewing Jason Scott Montoya about his upcoming book, Path of the Freelancer. The book is a deep dive into the world of freelancing.

The book is available for pre-order now at Amazon. Path of the Freelancer is available in soft cover at this point.

From Amazon:

“Freelancing Is Difficult. Are You Ready For This Rewarding Challenge?
After the shutdown of his marketing firm, Jason Montoya unexpectedly had numerous business owners and non-profit leaders requesting his help to solve their organization’s communication problems. Facing numerous challenges as a new freelancer, he quickly integrated his business insights to move through the many familiar obstacles he faced. He then began sharing with other freelancers a framework of eight vital achievements, see below, that took him to a state of personal and vocational flourishing. Behind these covers, he dives into these mile markers, unveils a blueprint and shares personal stories to help guide and equip other freelancers in their difficult but rewarding journey.”

Treat this as a podcast. Not much visual interest in the Youtube, but massive audio experience. I hope you enjoy this interview with Jason Montoya. He has lots more information on freelancing at his two websites.

Jason’s website: jasonscottmontoya.com

Path of the Freelancer website: pathofthefreelancer.com

If you are a freelancer or thinking about becoming a freelancer, you need this book.

A big thanks to Jason for spending time with us.

CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS


PROJECT 52: A NEW BEGINNING FOR A NEW AGE

Get on the list for more information. Enrollment starts soon.