Personal Sports Equipment: Five Examples of Lighting

Personal Sports Equipment: Five Examples of Lighting

The assignment was to shoot personal sports equipment (non-team sports). The photographers gave us some very nice shots, and the ways they came up with them really rock.

Rainie Mills gave us a workout box with an example of its use. The key element in her image was to create some modeling to the athlete, premier the box and keep the background flat in order to amplify the graphic nature of the composition.

The lighting example is actually reversed. the large softbox is to camera right, with the feathered fill on camera right. The large source, in close, provides a very smooth transition from highlight to shadow and we see that as ‘soft light’. Also notice the gradation on the box due to the close light placement… you can see the light falling off. (ISL)

Albert Madrilejos chose to shoot a ping pong player just about to deliver a serve. A very simple lighting setup gave him some flexibility in how he wanted to portray the player.

With the sun coming over the players right shoulder (camera left) Albert used a bare speedlight to add a main light to camera right. This light is not that much brighter than the ambient, so the shadows do not go too dark, nor does it give that ‘flash photo’ look. Carefully blending ambient / direct sun / flash is an art worth working on. Albert does a great job with it here.

Michael Klinepier’s shot of a heavy bag being struck is both dynamic and graphic. Careful use of light and gesture turn what could have been a mundane photo into one with impact. Note the use of the ‘dust’ from the bag, and now the highlight on the bag leads us to the logo.

As you can see in the behind the scenes shot, the bag and arm are lit by a strip box to camera left. The addition of a very well placed snoot light gives us a bright highlight on the side of the bag, and opens up the logo to be brighter. To the left, a shiny reflector gives only a tiny reflection on the back of the bag… but bright enough to show us it is there. Since the exposure was so bright on the subject, the background went to darkness. Minor retouching was used to make the background fully black.

Richard Neuboeck wanted the bright orange of the ropes and climbing tools to stand out, so he designed a very low-key shoot with black and orange only. Allowing the model to fade into the black background was his goal to help the ropes stand out.

Of course, shooting someone dangling from a rope in the studio could be a tough assignment.

Richard chose a large, shoot thru umbrella for his main light. These sources scatter the light in a wide dispersion which was necessary for this shot. He hung the rope from a large ladder and added a fill to camera left to help keep the shadow side of the items brighter. He found he needed a bit more fill from the bottom as well, so that is the added fill from below.

Khemais Hajri chose a handful of golf balls for his subject, and he worked to get the lighting to capture his vision of a shot with texture and dimension. This is a well-propped studio shot, and features some great lighting. Note the specular on the front-left side of the golf balls, and the bright kicker light on the back side of them. The balls are showing their texture, roundness and color very well.

To get this light, Kam installed a large scrim with a softbox behind it. The scrim not only cut the light down (needed because it was still too bright at lowest setting) but also gave a wide, gradient light to the image. Note that the softbox is turned away from the scrim offering it more light toward camera and less away.

The addition of the small black foam boards helped cut the specular down on the golf balls and add a bit of contrast to them as well.

Plants and leaves were brought in to the set and an additional Elinchrom head was placed behind them. This light was modified with a beauty dish, and a gold reflector. and provided a very warm backlight to the set.

One last addition was the crumpled gold material to help add even more warmth. This material worked as a tiny fill light and can be seen on the shadow side of the fingers. Attention to detail is what makes studio still life work so much fun.

 

PROJECT 52 HAS BEEN A LAUNCHPAD FOR HUNDREDS OF PHOTOGRAPHERS OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS.

THE TRADITION CONTINUES WITH A REBOOT.

ENROLLMENT STARTS EARLY MARCH 2017.

SIGNUP HERE FOR NOTIFICATION.

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SPROUTS!!! Love ’em or hate ’em?

SPROUTS!!! Love ’em or hate ’em?

The assignment was to shoot Brussel’s Sprouts. Anyway you want.

Some people do not like Brussel’s Sprouts, and some people love Brussel’s Sprouts. Couldn’t find anyone who was ambivalent to them. Either love ’em or hate ’em.

The image above is by Karen Green who really, REALLY hates Brussel’s Sprouts. She focused stacked a surface of sprouts being trampled by the women’s shoes. It is the focus stacking that makes the image seem a bit surreal. Our normal view of a scene like this would have some depth of field drop off, but she kept the entire image in focus and it adds a layer of interest to the image that rocks.

Anne Stephenson took a humorous approach to the idea of a gumball machine that gave out Brussel’s Sprouts. Two lights on the side and a special on the hand give the dispenser a bit of an otherworldly look. Keeping the light lower than the subject adds to the mystery.

Rick Savage takes a very moody light to his recipe shot. This point of view makes the parts of the image seem a bit unrelated and with a strange relationship. The dark, moody light was created by a single softbox over the set.

James Kern likes to use fire in his images, and the Brussel’s Sprouts challenge was no exception. A photographer must be very careful when doing images with fire, as it can tend to go where you don’t want it to go.

This is a single glass with water / lighter fluid set ablaze and a sprout dropped into the glass. James used mirrors to get the different views of the glass, fire, and dropping sprout.

We can safely put Matt Moriarty in the ‘hate sprouts’ camp. In this image, the hero would rather sign a confession than eat Brussel’s Sprouts. Heh.

Judicious use of snoots / grids and good styling brings the image to reality. The use of the dark background gives it an air of mystery as well as foreboding… and then there’s those damn sprouts!

Kurt Moore specializes in light painting. This image is the culmination of many different images painted with his flashlight/modifiers to give the image a most unique feel.

Kurt lights each part of the still life separately and then assembles them in a composite of layers that are revealed and hidden to give the image its special look. This is difficult and tedious work, and Kurt does it very well.

PROJECT 52 HAS BEEN A LAUNCHPAD FOR HUNDREDS OF
PHOTOGRAPHERS OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS.

THE TRADITION CONTINUES WITH A REBOOT.

ENROLLMENT STARTS SOON.

SIGNUP HERE FOR NOTIFICATION.

Behind the Image: Nicole Fernley

Behind the Image: Nicole Fernley

Nicole shot these images for the Still Life Class. The idea was to shoot a portrait and a landscape of the same image to see how the subject matter changes in the POV of the camera. She wanted a very soft, natural feel to the light.

The photo at the top shows the landscape view and the two images below show how the portrait view changes the relationship of the eggs to the background by including more of the contextual area around the subject.

The image on the left adds a bit of candle warmth to the images.

You can see the fill board reflection on the shadow side in the images below.

Here is her lighting scheme for the still life. The soft scrim is just above the subject and is diffusing the already diffused sunlight from the window nearby. This allows for the ambient of the window light to be used as well as the soft, scrimmed light from above.

I think those 5 in one reflector kits with the scrims inside are the best bang for the buck for lighting. Buy two.

All photographs by Nicole Fernley.

Daily Critique / Image Review: 1-17-17

Daily Critique / Image Review: 1-17-17

This is an ongoing feature of Lighting Essentials, a Place for Photographers.

We will be looking at images on a consistent basis. The images will all be work from my 8 Week Workshops or Project 52 Pros. These critiques will be short, but very informative and full of lighting, composition, and professional tips to help you become a better photography.

Note: we are focused on commercial and editorial photography, not consumer work.

Our Photographers.

ANNE STEPHENSON

DUCK UNITAS

KURT MOORE

MELISSA VAUGHN

For more information on upcoming classes, check the workshops tab above.

Daily Critique / Review

Daily Critique / Review

This is an ongoing feature of Lighting Essentials, a Place for Photographers.

We will be looking at images on a consistent basis. The images will all be work from my 8 Week Workshops or Project 52 Pros. These critiques will be short, but very informative and full of lighting, composition, and professional tips to help you become a better photography.

Note: we are focused on commercial and editorial photography, not consumer work.

Behind the Image: John Mcallister

Behind the Image: John Mcallister

This is a new feature on Lighting Essentials. We take a look at images and how they were made.

We will be doing these posts as often as possible, and if you follow along you will get a heavy dose of instruction in lighting, composition, and the finesse of solving problems in the image making process.

John McAllister is a product, people, and commercial photographer in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, UK.

Here he is using a unique way to light these two products and is happy to share them with you here.

Kraken image:

John used several different lights to create this shot, but his unique use of a snoot behind carefully cut holes is exceptional. These two holes are ‘aimed’ at parts of the image to create a sharp edged shadow on the glass and a heightened contrast that makes the color pop.

Studying the lighting diagram and the BTS shot, we can see John’s meticulous attention to detail and manipulation of the reflective areas of the subject.

Ciroc image:

You can see the work of John’s lighting taking shape in how the bottle is presented. With long, beautiful speculars on each side of the bottle and the small circle of light around the label, the bottle is shown as a unique product. Adding a bit of light on the bottom of the bottle and the glass, the bottom hole in John’s cuki makes a very subtle change to the way the label is presented.

Study this incredible lighting scheme. Note the way John angles the strip box behind the scrim on the right side of the shot. This gives the specular a subtle gradation that adds dimension and snap.

(I hope you enjoy this new feature on Lighting Essentials.