Finding Commercial Photography Clients: Pt. One – Portfolio


 

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Build a Solid Client List

Finding and Keeping Commercial Photography Clients

NOTE: This is a course for emerging commercial photographers. The methods we discuss may be of interest to consumer photographers as well, but are highly focused on the commercial part of our industry. Thank you.

This is part one of a five part free course on finding and keeping commercial photography clients. It is an introduction to a far more robust course that will be offered July 1. There is no ‘selling’ in this video – or the next three, but in the last one I will show you how to sign up for the more detailed and comprehensive program. These videos are high in value and even if you do not sign up for the full course, you will find them extremely helpful.

To get the remaining 4 videos, please signup for “In the Frame”, my weekly dispatch. The classes will come to you one per week. You will find the sign up on the right hand column. Thank you for being interested, now let’s talk about your portfolio.

Inspired by Skrebneski

The first set of images from the 8 Week Portrait Class came in last evening and they are really good. The class takes a close look at 8 major portrait photographers by analyzing what they do, how they accomplished their imagery and what the thought process was behind the work.

The students then create a shot that was inspired by the photographer we studied. The goal for some is to replicate the style (to see if they can capture it) and for others it is to simply be inspired by the work and then create something within their own style that pays homage to the photographer.

We call it building the toolkit. The more ways you can think of to create an image, the more your creativity will take over. Creating your own personal style is the goal, learning from those who have great personal style is a method that works.

This first image set was inspired by the work of Skrebneski.

Enjoy.

“The Sprinklers” (A Mother’s Day Essay)

sprinkler

(My daughter, Alissa, wrote this Friday for one of her final assignments. It fits in nicely for mother’s day.)

Sprinklers

My mom used to tell my sisters and me that if we ran through the sprinklers we would feel like different people. We could do anything, be anything, without worrying about the future. When we ran through the sprinklers we were transported to whole different worlds. Some with endless possibilities. All with childlike joy and imagination. “The sprinklers will always be there for you. You just have to look for them.”

My older sister and I used to run through the sprinklers every afternoon in the park near our school. We skipped to the park and stopped by the edge of the grass. We put our backpacks down and took off our shoes, then lined our toes up to where the sidewalk meets the grass – just barely touching the wetness. I would close my eyes and hear my mother’s voice echoing in my mind, telling me I could be whatever I wanted to be in those sprinklers. I looked at my sister and we held hands as we were transported to a different world. Running through sprinklers. Running through sparkling, diamond drops of water. Possibilities. Joy.

I am now a senior in high school. My baby steps are over, and it’s time to become an adult. Being an adult comes with responsibilities and worries. I walk home from school on a sunny day and I think about the future. What will I study in college? Will I graduate? Will I ever move out of my parents house? How will I pay for all the adult stuff like insurance and utilities? Will I ever get a job to help me pay for all of these things? Will I find a career that I love?

My mind was ripped away from that worrisome reality when I felt water hitting my toes. I looked up to see the sprinklers in the park near the school. I glanced around. Was anyone going to see me? Who cares?! I put my backpack down and took my sandals off, and lined my toes up to where the sidewalk meets the grass. My toes barely touched the wetness. I looked around again, and then I went for it. As I ran through the sprinklers carefree and in my own world, I could hear my mom’s voice, “You can be anything, do anything.” I was laughing as all my troubles went away. I was in a different place where I felt safe and free. There were endless possibilities. Whatever happens in life that makes me stressed and upset, I can and will always count on those sprinklers to be there for me. I believe in running through sprinklers and connecting with my inner child. I’ll never let go of her, especially when she is needed most. The sprinklers will always be there – I just have to look for them.

— Alissa Giannatti, May 2015

Portrait Class Members Discuss the Workshop

“Imitate. Assimilate. Innovate.”

Clark Terry, Jazz trumpet genius.

This portrait class (and the companion 102 class) have been huge successes. The students are fired up and some are saying they are making the best images of their lives.

We look closely at the work of 8 major portrait photographers and study their way of working, lighting, posing, gestures, style and presentation. NOT in order to copy them, but in order to find the elements that ring true with our own experiences and aesthetics. To be ‘inspired by’ is the goal, and we all want to be inspired by the best.

Skrebneski, Karsh, Moon, Lindbergh, Ritts, Winters, Sieff, and Coupon are amazing photographers. Each brings something to the art of photography that can inspire us to push harder, light better, be more deliberate with our work.

Many of the students remark that their images coming straight out of camera are better and better. When we think deliberately about what we are doing, the quality of the work cannot help but get better.

We currently are enrolling for a class that starts May 19th, 2015. Get more information here. These are limited engagement classes.

Photographers on the broadcast:
Barbara Brady-Smith
Catherine Vibert
Irene Liebler
Virginia Smith
Jay Chatzkel
Bob Earle
Ron Velasquez
Marianne Cherry
Hiram Chee